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Posts from the ‘England’ category

The Tudor Christmas and the Trencher

Tudor Trencher

Tudor Trencher

In 1526 the Eltham Ordinances were written at Eltham Palace. These were rules and regulations monitoring food purchases, storage and distribution of food across all the palaces.

The Eltham Ordinances also laid down instructions for court ceremony, for example how the food was presented and the manner in which it had to be taken to the table. The rules were put forward by the Lord Steward, who was chosen by the nobility and had great power and influence. He was also in charge of fuel supply, domestic services and the regulation of the entire estate.

At Christmas in 1526, about 600 courtiers were entitled to eat in the Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace. This group was made up of guards, grooms and general court servants. Henry VIII ate in his private lodgings and only ate with the majority of the court on celebratory or state occasions. Where you ate; which was the Great Watching Chamber, the Great Hall, the kitchens or in private lodgings on the grounds depended on your rank. The Lord Chamberlain granted permission for dining arrangements, writing the plan called the Bouche de Court, which gave an allowance to each named person for two meals a day (at 10am and 4pm) and allowed the daily ration of bread, wine, beer, candles and firewood.

Two seatings were required to seat all of the people, who would have been served two courses. 

To see how the food was distributed from the courtyard to the table look here. (Courtyard to Table)

I am always interested in what the most common of men did.

At the Tutor Court the food was brought into the Great Hall in “messes.” (a dish shared between four people) The food was served up by the most senior man at the table. For the lowest ranking members at a table the food was served onto a chunk of course brown bread with a slight indentation, called a trencher. What is important to note is that the bread was not eaten, just what was placed on the bread. After the meal, the used trenchers, with the soppings from the meal, were given to the poor to eat.

Leftovers from Henry VIII’s table, the Great Watching Chamber, and the Great Hall were collected in a ‘voider’ (a large basket) and would be distributed to the poor by the Almoner. Those who ate in their own rooms were to take their leftovers to the scullery for the same purpose.  The Eltham Ordinances, states: “all such as have their lodgings within the court shall give straight charge to the ministers and keepers of their chambers, that they do not cast, leave or lay in any manner of dishes, platters, saucers, or broken meat, either in the galleries or at their chamber door……. and likewise to put the relics of their ale into another vessel, so that broken meat or drink be in no way cast away or eaten by dogs, nor lie in the galleries or courts, but may be daily saved for the relief of poor folks.” Anyone who disobeyed this rule was punished and on the third offense, any who failed to give their leftovers to the Almoner would forfeit their allowance, lodging and “Bouche de Court” (the permission to eat and drink at court)

As eating was communal, it was important to follow the strict rules of etiquette: these were elaborate, yet practical, as they prevented anyone touching food that would be eaten by someone else. Everyone brought his own knife and spoon to the meal. The requirement for a personal spoon is behind the custom of giving one as a christening gift.

The Waissail Cup

The Wassail Cup

A final festive feature, celebrated during the Tudor Christmas was the Wassail Cup. This was a richly ornamented cup which would be paraded through the great hall, and drunk from by all present as they took part in a call-and-response ritual – the drinker would shout ‘wassail’ and the collective response was ‘drink hail’. The drink in the Wassail bowls was often a warmed alcohol, such as mulled cider, sweetened and spiced. The bowl shown above even has its own whistle to alert the kitchen that more drink was needed.

These were the Rules of Etiquette at the Tudor table.

Sit not down until you have washed.

Undo your belt a little if it will make you more comfortable; because doing this during the meal is bad manners.

When you wipe your hands clean, put good thoughts forward in your mind, for it doesn’t do to come to dinner sad, and thus make others sad.

Once you sit place your hands neatly on the table; not on your trencher, and not around your belly.

Don’t shift your buttocks left and right as if to let off some blast. Sit neatly and still.

Any gobbit that cannot be taken easily with the hand, take it on your trencher.

Don’t wipe your fingers on your clothes; use the napkin or the ‘board cloth’.

If someone is ill mannered by ignorance, let it pass rather than point it out.

Good rules to follow even now, I’d say.

Tomorrow, we’ll learn what happened to the Trencher in Queen Elizabeth’s rule! See you then!

A Stroll Through Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

 

The Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

The Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Upon arrival the Brookfield House B&B looked like this!

Located on a quiet side street it is still close enough to walk to the shops and restaurants. The Brookfield B&B was the perfect spot to stay in so let’s look at some of those photos first! We like staying in small B&B’s when we travel and now when my husband is traveling for work he tends to look for B&B’s as well. Brookfield is a charming re-stored Victorian property with six rooms and a small staff offering attentive service. My husband started the day at 0600, but the owner, Lisa, was up every morning to make sure he got his full English breakfast!

The Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

The Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

The Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

The Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Looking out…….

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

The Entryway looked like this………..

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

The Dining Area looked like this…….

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

And his room looked like this…….

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Then a stroll around town looked like this……..

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The weather is becoming blustery!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

And rainy……..

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

And the temperature is dropping…….

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Royal Hall, Harrogate, UK

Royal Hall, Harrogate, UK

Royal Baths, Harrogate, UK

Royal Baths, Harrogate, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Look closely at the statues on this building!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

I wonder who has the job of placing scarves and hats on the statues? The weather is taking a turn for the worse!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

And everyone should visit Bettys! That’s all anyone talked about! Hubby needed something hot about now!

Betty's Tearoom and Chocolates, Harrogate, UK

Betty’s Tearoom and Chocolates, Harrogate, U

But alas, it was the last week and the weather was appropriate!

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

Brookfield B&B, Harrogate, UK

And at the airport in Leeds……..Not Going Anywhere Too Soon!

Not Going Anywhere Any Too Soon!

Not Going Anywhere Any Too Soon!

I hope you enjoyed my hubby’s first attempt to get pictures for me when visiting a great city in the UK. I am sad that I missed out on it because it looks just like the kind of place I love to visit!

For information about the Brookfield B&B in Harrogate look here! I think you will find it as charming as my hubby did! ‘Till next time!

 

 

Agatha Christie’s Biggest Mystery

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

In December 1926, Agatha Christie was a thirty-six year old, established crime writer, when she mysteriously disappeared. Early on the morning of December 3rd, Colonel Archibald Christie, an aviator in the Royal Flying Corps, had asked Agatha for a divorce because he was in love with another woman, Nancy Neele. He then packed up and went to spend the weekend with his mistress. Later that evening, Agatha left the house leaving two notes; one for her brother-in-law saying she was going to Yorkshire and one for the town constable saying she feared for her life. Her crashed car was found nearby, hanging over the edge of a chalk pit, with her fur coat,  suitcases and identity papers thrown about the car and Agatha nowhere to be found.  A massive manhunt began which included the dredging of a large pond and thousands of police and locals joining to scour the countryside. The manhunt included the first use of airplanes to search for missing people. Archie Christie seemed unconcerned when summoned, yes, he had to be summoned to the crash site, and simply stated his wife was a mysterious and calculating woman, who probably made the whole thing up to promote her latest book! Astonished, the constable placed Archie at the top of the suspect list and had his phone tapped, where his affair and want of a divorce was soon discovered.

As the days went on, the search spread out to all parts of Great Britain. Fellow mystery writers got involved: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle took one of Agatha’s gloves to a noted psychic and Dorothy L. Sayers visited Agatha’s house and the place where the car was found.

It wasn’t until December 14th that the search ended. As it turned out, Agatha had walked to the train station, after crashing her car, and took a train to London. In London she went shopping for  clothes and a new coat and then took the train to Harrogate, which she had seen on an advertisement at the train station.

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

She checked into The Old Swan Hotel and Spa on the 4th of December under a false name (using, ironically, the surname of Archie’s mistress) Harrogate was the height of elegance in the 1920s and filled with fashionable people looking for fun and excitement. Agatha Christie did nothing to arouse suspicions as she joined in dining, playing billiards, going for spa treatments and attending the balls and dances at the Palm Court at the Swan Hotel.

She even placed an advertisement in the newspaper offering where Teresa Neele was staying.

She was eventually recognized by one of the hotel’s banjo players, Bob Tappin, who alerted the police. They tipped off her husband, Colonel Christie, who came to collect Agatha immediately. Agatha seemed confused and mis-identified Archie as her brother.

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

The Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Agatha was brought home and was quickly and completely hidden from reporters.

Because nobody was providing any answers, various scenarios would later be given by the newspapers as theories as to what had happened: temporary amnesia, a nervous breakdown, a plot of revenge to embarrass and humiliate her husband, or a publicity stunt to increase sales of her books. Nobody knew for certain what had transpired. And nobody knows to this day. Agatha never, ever mentioned the episode again. Her divorce was finalized two years later.

And in the end the police charged Agatha Christie for the pay of all the police, and the use of the airplanes during their search for her.

So as noted in my previous post, I was not happy about missing the trip to Harrogate and exploring the Swan Hotel, which was a priority for me. But, as it turned out, my hubby took the time to go to the Hotel and take photos for me and while there he discovered that the Hotel was offering Agatha Christie Mystery Dinners during the month of November, in honor of the 90th anniversary of Agatha’s disappearance. It was a themed mystery taking place in Egypt among the archeologists. Everyone was to dress the part. My husband promptly signed himself up along with a business associate, another man, to attend the mystery dinner. When he told me about it I thought it would be a lot of fun and noted most people would dress the part. On the night of the event, many were indeed dressed in sheik’s robes, archeological dig clothing, or dresses of the roaring twenties, except for said two men. There was even a mix up in their names, since the hotel didn’t think two men would be attending the event together and it must have been a mistake in names, so changed one of the place tag names from Mr O——-, to just Olivia. The men had a good laugh and proceeded with the mystery.  During the dinner, several actors staged sketches and then went around to the ten various tables offering clues and talking to the guests. By the end of the evening the guests at each table were  to collectively name the killer. Table Ten did not discover the correct killer, but had a great time with their table mates, four women from Spain, four women from London, and two men from the US, in trying to figure the mystery out.

The Actors at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

The Actors at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

The Actors at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

The Actors at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

It was soon discovered that one of the finely dressed women at this table was actually a 6 foot-five inch, well built man, named Bill! (the guest with the dangling earrings) Great costume Bill!

Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

Actors and Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

Actors and Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

The Big Fight Skit during the Agatha Christie Murder Mystery Dinner

The Big Fight Skit during the Agatha Christie Murder Mystery Dinner

Another Death to Deal With!

Another Death to Deal With!

Table Ten

Table Ten

Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

And to top off the evening….. The Swan dessert!

 Actors and Guests at Agatha Christie Dinner Mystery, Old Swan Hotel, Harrogate, UK

A great time was had by all and one thing is for sure. Agatha Christie is still the greatest mystery writer of all time, even her own!

Tomorrow will be the last day in Harrogate. Won’t you join me to find out all about it? See you then!

 

Thursday Doors: Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

 

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

A few weeks ago I was supposed to be in……..

Harrogate, a spa town in North Yorkshire, England. The town became known as ‘The English Spa’ in the Georgian era, after its waters were discovered in the 16th century. In the 17th and 18th centuries its ‘chalybeate’ waters (containing iron) were a popular health treatment, and the influx of wealthy, but sickly visitors, contributed significantly to the wealth of the town. I probably should have gone; the spa treatments would have done me good. But, because I was not feeling up to it, my husband who had business there, was encouraged to take a doorscursion for me. Here are the results of his efforts! Pretty good I’d say! Especially, since he had to go after work hours, in the dark, and in rain or snow every evening! How nice to enjoy Harrogate today in the snow as he did!! What a lovely place! First we’ll look at the blue doors.

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

In the glass pane you can see him taking the photo! Great shot dear!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Do you see all the wrought iron and heavy metal drainpipes in most of these photos? They are artwork in themselves!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Some things are just black and white in life!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

And sometimes Aqua!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

I want to think these are “His and Her” letter boxes! Ha Ha!

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

I’d definitely say black doors were the most popular!

Isn’t this the cutest menswear shop store front?

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK

And the other reason I hated to miss this trip, was I wanted to go to the Swan Hotel! What’s at the Swan Hotel you ask? We’ll discover that tomorrow!  See you there!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

November: Do Not Sit Home

 

Do Not Sit Home

Do Not Sit Home

Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.

Dale Carnegie

To me, November is everything about the home. We are preparing our homes for the shorter days and longer dark nights; settling in so to speak with a good book and a cup of cocoa in front of the fire. November is also all about the family and food and sharing. So through November I will share tidbits about the home and some fascinating photos of homes around the world. Enjoy!

Good Fences at Great Dixter, East Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Esat Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, East Sussex, UK

Here is my first entry for the “Good Fences”  Photo Challenge! Every year I do my own English Garden Tour of selected gardens in the UK. This is a handmade fence at Great Dixter Manor and Gardens in East Sussex. I chose this photo because it showed part of the manor house, the wildness of this section of the garden and the use of old limbs and twigs for fencing! Enjoy!

See more about the Challenge Here!

Great Dixter Manor: Part Two

 

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Previously we learned the history of Great Dixter and today we will continue our walk around the grounds and gardens.  Apart from a couple of mixed orchards and a scattering of trees, there were no gardens here when the Lloyds arrived in 1910. There are many out-buildings on the property including several old barns. As buildings continue to be restored it is good to know that nothing is thrown away, but recycled to use on other projects. Old, thin, laminated tiles were used for the new roof on the loggia, that was previously the old chicken shed with rotted walls.

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

The Loggia Roof, Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

I think these buildings may be in future works…… or maybe not.

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

However, this might need an improvement……..it is the handicapped bathroom! Very primitive, but you get the feel for how things once were!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Most of the garden design was by Edwin Lutyens.  The gardens are separated by yew hedges, which are sometimes curved, low brick walls, and many, many paths!  The borders are mixed and in all colors. There is no segregating plants of differing habits, so you see shrubs, climbers, hardy and tender perennials, annuals and biennials, all growing together and contributing to the overall tapestry. There are nineteen different gardens here!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Some of the paving is of York sandstone.  London’s pavements were ripped up and replaced by tarmac, and the stone became available for garden use. Lichens grow on it, making their own patterns, particularly noticeable at their ‘flowering’, in April. But the stone is slippery when wet!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

There is a large nursery here and many folks came to shop!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Nothing is wasted! Save the rainwater!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

One of the young gardeners showing us the grounds was a student from the U.S. She is participating in the USA Christopher Lloyd Scholarship. The scholarship provides a gardener from the United States with a year-long, practical education in the traditional style of ornamental gardening as practiced at two of the world’s most respected gardens, Great Dixter in East Sussex, England, and Chanticleer near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

The scholarship offers an American gardener a chance to develop practical skills and an understanding of the ‘sense of place’ needed to manage complex, innovative flower gardens such as those at Great Dixter and Chanticleer. It is hoped that the scholar, in turn, will inspire a future generation of North American gardeners, passing on knowledge and skills. The student spends 11 months, from September to July, living and working at Great Dixter, immersed in all aspects of the garden’s operations and also attends symposiums and visits gardens, plant trials and garden shows. The final month of the scholarship is spent working at Chanticleer. Wow how great is that?

A map of Great Dixter is Here! I hope you enjoyed our tour of Great Dixter! I certainly did. This is the last garden of the year on my English Garden Tour! I have enjoyed every one and hope you did too! Until next time in the garden!

Great Dixter Manor, Part One

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

This is the oldest section of Great Dixter Manor and as you can see it tips to the left!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

All great manors have a fascinating story to tell and Great Dixter is no exception. Nathanial Lloyd, born in Manchester, made his fortune when he founded his own color printing firm in 1893.  In 1905, he  married Daisy Field and rented a manor home in Rye where Nathanial could play golf on the weekends. He became so successful in his business, that by 1909, he was able to retire and devoted himself to golf and his passion for shooting. Nathanial and Daisy began to look for an old house to buy and they purchased Dixter, (a manor completed by the end of the Middle Ages), and its immediate grounds and farm buildings in May, 1910, for six thousand pounds, and the manor was re-named Great Dixter.

Nathanial and Daisy Lloyd

Nathanial and Daisy Lloyd

Lloyd hired Sir Ernest George as his architect, but soon realized that the apprentice to George, Edwin Lutyens,  was the man to complete his manor. Lutyens wanted to enlarge or adapt existing buildings by using local materials and build on existing traditions. He drew up plans which consisted of the mid-15th century original home and added additions to it, by bringing a yeoman’s house from Benenden.  He then added another addition to the house in 1912. So the manor then consisted of three houses, beautifully connected together. Lutyens admired the work of Gertrude Jekyll, who had a reputation for complimenting the grounds of the manors to the garden, which was a new approach to the English Garden. The ideas of Jekyll led Lutyens to design an English Garden for Great Dixter. Lutyens went on designing and building to become  “the greatest British architect of the twentieth (or of any other) century.”

Edwin Lutyens

Edwin Lutyens

This was the ” Yeoman’s House” moved from Benenden, seventeen miles away! I don’t think I could have had that big of imagination! How could the combining of the houses work? The Yeoman’s House was literally falling down!

The House Moved from Benenden

The House Moved from Benenden

Nathaniel and Daisy Lloyd raised six children at Great Dixter where they all developed a lasting attachment to the house and a deep knowledge of the garden. One of the bathrooms still has the pencil marks on a wall, recording their increasing height year by year. Selwyn (1909-35), the eldest child, went into the family business, but died at a young age from TB; Oliver (1911-85), whose second Christian name Cromwell spoke of Daisy’s ancestral connections, became a medical doctor and academic; Patrick (1913-56) was a professional soldier and died on active service in the Middle East; Quentin (1916-95) served as the estate manager for Great Dixter for many years; Letitia (1919-74) trained as a nurse; Christopher (1921-2006), the youngest child, was born in the north bedroom of the Lutyens wing and for the rest of his life Dixter was his home.

The Lloyd Childen

The Lloyd Childen

With the renovations and extension complete by 1912, Great Dixter was a large and comfortable family home. Central heating and electric lighting were installed from the onset and there was a domestic staff of five or more, including a chauffeur, a cook, two housemaids and a nursery maid. Outside staff included nine gardeners. For four years during the First World War, part of the house became a hospital and a total of 380 wounded soldiers passed through the temporary wards created in the Great Hall. In the Second War, Dixter housed evacuee boys from September 1939 until it was decided that they should go further west and away from the path of enemy aircraft.

After Nathaniel’s death in 1933, Daisy was in control until her death in 1972. Her contribution to the garden was most evident in the wild flower meadows, but her passion for all things plant related was as extensive as it was infectious. She was a determinedly energetic lady, an accomplished cook and brilliant embroiderer, who, having taken to wearing Austrian peasant costume, became an eccentric figure on the local scene. Christopher Lloyd, exceptional gardener and writer of gardening books, was the last Lloyd to occupy the manor and it was left to a charitable trust upon his death in 2006.

Christopher Lloyd

Christopher Lloyd

Part of the manor is open, but no photography is allowed inside!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

But we did manage a photo of the garden from the window!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

We took many photos of the gardens around various out buildings such as the oasts, which were restored in 2012.

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

This was one of the meadows. I just couldn’t get wrapped up in it though. I didn’t like the formal topiaries mixed in with the meadow. I would have preferred all lawn around these, but they didn’t ask me.

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

I think they were undecided too!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Flowers, flowers everywhere!

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

The Loggia…….with more flowers and plants……

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter, Sussex, UK

I hope you enjoyed the history of Great Dixter! There is a lot to explore here, so we’ll meet up with you again tomorrow! Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

The Last Walk Through Pashley Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Here are the final photos I’ll show from Pashley Gardens. Truly, if I had one garden that I liked the best above all others I have seen in the last two years, it would be this one. The setting among the rolling hills and ponds was breathtakingly quiet. The garden was immaculate with all flowers and plants labeled. The gardeners could answer all my questions. The restaurant was very good and the view of the lawn and the pond was perfect for relaxing. The gift house had interesting gifts that I did not see at any other garden. The sculpture in the garden made you feel you were in a fine outdoor art museum. If I lived near I would have bought all the plants available from Pashley Manor and planted them in my garden. I would be proud to grow “London Pride.” I would attend the Tulip Festival, Rose Week, the Dahlia Delight, and at Christmas would shop with the fragrance of mulled wine wafting over me as I bought the orange and cinnamon candles and mince pies! I would be there so often they would know me by name! If you love visiting gardens add this one to your list by all means!

Pashley Manor and Gardens

The Vegetable Patch at Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

The Vegetable Patch at Pashley Manor and Gardens

Here we are in the Vegetable Patch with the chickens and the rabbits……

Pashley Manor and Gardens

The Chickens at Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

The Rabbits at Pashley Manor and Gardens

And green leafy plants…….

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Now to go to the pool area………

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

A good way to read a book……

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Next the green house………

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

My Favorite piece by Helen Sinclair……….The Waif.

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

A peek through the gate………

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

to see the Bowsers that guard……..and the twirl of her skirts…..

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

And a close up to show the Manor is actually pale pink!

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

The plant area with a small chapel where the gift shop is……..I’ll collect my goodies…..

The Gift Area at Pashley Manor Gardens, Ticehurst, UK

The Gift Area at Pashley Manor Gardens, Ticehurst, UK

And say goodbye!

Pashley Manor and Gardens

Pashley Manor and Gardens

I hope to visit again soon! See you in the garden!

Thursday Doors at Great Dixter, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter is the private home and garden of the late gardener and gardening writer, Christopher Lloyd. First let’s look at the doors I found there!

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

We had a great deal of action with doors here……. keep the door open……..

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Ring the bell loudly………

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Don’t go in……..

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Go in……..

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Duck or grouse (grumble or complain because you have hit your head)…….mind your head……….

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

Great Dixter Garden, Sussex, UK

We rang, we opened, we closed, we ducked, we minded, but did not grouse, and we enjoyed all the doors!

Soon we will explore the history and walk the grounds of Great Dixter! See you in the garden!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

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