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Happy New Year!

Auld lang Syne

Auld lang Syne

It has been a wonderful year! Thank you to all my blogging friends, and friends on FB and Twitter! And those of you who follow me by email!

I wish you the best in 2017!

Here is the ‘New Blog’ as promised! Look Here! I will no longer be posting here, but you will still be able to view old posts.

Poke around and hit all the buttons on the new blog! Please let me know if something doesn’t work!

I look forward to all your posts and comments in the new year!

Cady Luck Leedy

 

 

Happy New Year’s Eve!

Happy New Year's Eve

This is the last post on this blog! I will now be moving over to my new blog at http//:www.thecadyluckleedy.com! I will still be writing about my travels and such, only there will be a new name and a new look! I hope you will continue to follow me there, because I would miss chatting with you all!

This blog will not go away, I have too much work in it. I just will not be adding anything new to this site. On the new blog you can switch back and forth from this blog to the new one! Awesome!

You can follow me by adding your email address in the blue area at the bottom of my new site. I think the FB and Twitter links will still work. Have a blessed and Happy New Year! CadyLuckLeedy

Thursday Doors: Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Last week I showed you some photos of my small town. Today, December 28th, it is absolutely a spring day, (high 60’s) so I am strolling the campus of Davidson College, the town’s backbone. In the spring of 1835 a small group of Presbyterian churchmen got together in the home of William Lee Davidson, a North Carolina militia general during the American Revolutionary War. The men wanted to build a college, but the designated property had to meet strict requirements. It had to be land between two thriving big cities, Charlotte and Statesville, and “remarkably healthful, being free from malaria and other local causes of sickness.” It would be established for the education of young men for the gospel ministry, as well as planned as a self supporting manual labor institution; meaning all the students at that time were obligated to work in the fields three hours a day in the Manual Labor program.

By 1840 there were four faculty members (one also served as president) and eighty students. Upon arrival each student would go to each professor, where they would be given an entrance exam in each subject.

The college was here first and the town was built up around the college. The original name of the town was Davidson College. The college owned so much property it was decided to dispose of some of the land opposite the campus, by selling lots for houses. They offered a 99 year lease and a great deal of control over the behavior of its tenants. Anyone leasing a lot “could not vend, barter, traffic, give or deal in any way in ardent spirits, wine, cider, gin, porter, ale or any other kind of intoxicating liquor.” Many of these lots were bought by the professors to build their homes on and in later years some of the larger homes were turned into boarding houses for the students.

The Davidson College Map

The Davidson College Map

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

The Doors of Davidson Presbyterian Church

The Doors of Davidson Presbyterian Church

Last week I photographed the one block shopping area of our town across from Davidson College. Here is a view of Main Street from the college!

A View of Town

A View of Town

The students raised most of the money to build the private meeting halls; the Philanthropic Literary Society Hall, and the Eumenean Literary Society Hall, where social life was centered. Most of the students belonged to one or the other with a passionate loyalty. Both buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Philanthropic Literary Society Hall

The Philanthropic Literary Society Hall

The Eumenean

The Eumenean Literary Society Hall

Close Up of the Eumeneum Literary Society Hall

Close Up of the Eumeneum Literary Society Hall

In 1837 there were three small dormitories to accommodate the students. Each narrow building had four separate rooms with each room opening to the outside. They were called, “The Rows”; Oak and Elm.

Elm Row, Davidson College

Elm Row, Davidson College

Elm Row

Elm Row

Elm Row

Elm Row

The Drinking Fountain

The Drinking Fountain

A View of the Presbyterian Church from Campus

A View of the Presbyterian Church from Campus

Really Big Oak Trees

Really Big Oak Trees

The Davidson College Library

The Chambers Building

The Chambers Building

The Chambers Building, Up Close and Personal

I wanted to photograph some of the newer buildings as well ……..

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

And the grounds feature an arboretum and the trees are tagged for identification.

Tagged Crepe Myrtle

Tagged Crepe Myrtle

Today, Davidson College is a liberal arts college dedicated to cultivating humane instincts and disciplined, creative minds. Their lingo not mine. I hope that means graduates will be able to get a job!

See you in the New Year!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

PS……………….The BIG NEWS!!!! I have been working on a new blog site since October! So I will introduce it on January 1st! I will no longer be posting on this site after January 1st, although it will remain up to view. I have 3 years of work on this blog, too much to let just disappear!! My new blog features my photos much better and on the computer the website fills the entire screen! I hated having all the wasted space in my background, although I loved the black, it made my photos POP!  Well, I was up for a change! So, I hope to continue to hear from all of you in the New Year! Look for me at https://www.The CadyLuckLeedy.com, BUT NOT UNTIL THE 1ST OF JANUARY!!!!!!

Big News

Big News

The Christmas Eve Eats!

Dig In!

Parker House Buttery Rolls

Parker House Buttery Rolls

Christmas Gingerbread Mocha

Christmas Gingerbread Mocha

Christmas Tree Cheeseboard

Christmas Tree Cheeseboard

Cranberry Meatballs

Cranberry Cocktail Meatballs

Cheeseboard

Cheeseboard

AND…………….

Jingle Juice

Jingle Juice

Big News

Big News

 

 

 

Christmas Foods and Traditions: Stargazy Pie

Stargazy Pie

Stargazy Pie

I watched a good movie this week called Ladies in Lavender. The plot is so-so, and I don’t know where the lavender comes in, but my favorite actresses, Judi Dench and Maggie Smith are featured in it, so it makes my Favorites List. The movie was filmed in Cornwall and the coastal scenery is beautiful and the cottage setting and interior also make it worthwhile to see. I went to Cornwall this past summer so it brought back great memories for me. Well, in one scene the women are looking to buy pilchards (a large type of sardine) to make a Stargazy Pie! Oh My! It is made out to be quite a delicacy in the movie. So I had to find out if there was such a thing!

And there is…….

In December every year in the village of Mousehole, Cornwall there is a festival called Tom Bawcock’s Eve. Tom was a local fisherman in the 16th century and the festival is held to remember Tom and his act of heroism. According to legend, one stormy winter when no fishing boats were able to get out, and all in the village were facing starvation, on December 23rd, Tom Bawcock, decided to brave the storms and went out fishing in his boat. Despite the stormy weather and difficult sea, he came back with enough fish to feed the entire village. The entire catch (including seven types of fish) was baked into a pie made of eggs and potatoes with the heads and tails poking through the crust to prove that the fish were inside. The fish appear to be gazing skyward, hence the name of the pie!  This allows the oils to be released during cooking to flow back into the pie.

In 1963, another tradition was added to the Mousehole festivities. John Gilchrist, a local artist, strung Christmas lights around the harbor, and the idea was taken up by the local carpenters. Today a group of forty volunteers work months putting up over seven thousand bulbs and six miles of lights! The Lighting is attended by over four thousand people and starts with the village priest blessing the scene. In celebration and memorial to the efforts of Tom Bawcock the villagers parade a huge Stargazy Pie during the evening with a procession of handmade lanterns, before eating the pie itself! One set of lights even represents the pie, showing fish heads and tails protruding from a pie dish underneath six stars!

In the evening all harbor lights are turned off so people can watch the illuminations and lantern parade, followed by caroling on the beach! What fun this would be at Christmas! Well maybe not the pie so much, it would take getting used to. Have any of you ever had Stargazey pie? If you have let me know!

Big News

Big News

Thursday Doors: Christmas L.I.S.T. (Life In a Small Town)

Looking Down Main Street

Looking Down Main Street

Today we are celebrating Christmas Thursday Doors in my small spot of the world! The views are along Main Street, our shopping area, one short block, from one stop light to the next. There are only two stoplights in town! The shops are along just one side of the street. Across the street from the shops is the library and the “green” where concerts are held in the summer and the kids play football in the winter. I hope you enjoy the tour! Merry Christmas!

They say our town population is 11,000, but that includes a wide country/farm area too. I’d say about three thousand of us actually live within walking distance (a mile or so) of town. We do not get mail delivery. We must go to the post office and pick it up. Of course, that’s how we keep up with all the goings on!!

The Village Store

The Village Store

The Ladies’ Garden Club make the Christmas arrangements to hang all around town.

The Work of the Garden Club

The Work of the Garden Club

The doors can be left open today, as I took these pictures on Sunday, December 18, the temperature was 66 degrees!

Local, Affordable and Handmade

Local, Affordable and Handmade

Most of our restaurants have outdoor seating, although in the summer it is so hot here, it is too hot to sit outside unless it is very early or very late in the day! In the background is Davidson College.

Mestizo Restaurant

Mestizo Restaurant

You have to have a Bike Shop!

The Bike Shop

The Bike Shop

And the Davidson College Shop always looks cheerful! When the college is closed for breaks it is very quiet on the streets!

Already For Santa

All Ready For Santa!

Now this is the “real deal” bookstore!

Mainstreet Books

Mainstreet Books

Sign at Books

Sign at Mainstreet Books

And we have nice banners to display lest you forget where you are!

Christmas Davidson

Christmas In Davidson

Nandina

Nandina

Raefords Barber Shop is an institution in town, been here forever!

Raefords Barber Shop

Raefords Barber Shop

We got new signs a few years back!

Park Here!

Park Here!

Monkee’s, the ladies apparel shop.

Monkee's, You Might Need a Bigger Closet

Monkee’s, You Might Need a Bigger Closet

And finally, everyone needs a Pickled Peach!

The Pickled Peach

The Pickled Peach

I hope you have enjoyed my spot in the world! See you in the New Year!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

PS……………….The BIG NEWS!!!! I have been working on a new blog site since October! So I will introduce it on January 1st! I will no longer be posting on this site after January 1st, although it will remain up to view. I have 3 years of work on this blog, too much to let just disappear!! My new blog features my photos much better and on the computer the website fills the entire screen! I hated having all the wasted space in my background, although I loved the black, it made my photos POP!  Well I was up for a change! So I hope to continue to hear from all of you in the New Year! Look for me at https://www.ThatTravelLadyInHerShoes, a slight change in name!

Big News

Big News

 

 

 

Christmas Foods and Traditions: Cooking With Nigella

Nigella Lawson

Nigella Lawson

Last year for Christmas I gave myself one of the best gifts ever! Yes, I do give myself Christmas gifts, why not? When you get up in years you can do whatever you want. It was a subscription to Acorn TV, the All British TV Series. I love it and have watched nearly every show presented on there, every month. I get my moneys worth! The very first show I watched was Nigella Lawson’s Cooking Christmas Special, and I was glad to see it was still available to watch this year and I did watch it again this week!

You can’t help, but come away inspired to cook something! Or to look around your kitchen and say, “I need to drape several strings of fairy lights across my cabinets and place Christmas baubles all over my kitchen counters to be able to cook like Nigella.” Or, “I need a black, sexy, low cut gown or sweater to wear when cooking,” to be like Nigella. Need I say, Nigella is a full bodied, well endowed young woman that every cook would like to look like.

During the show she cooks awhile and then scampers out of the house to the local London street markets to buy the most wonderful ingredients to bring back and add to the pot so to speak. So you get to see the cooking aspect as well as the shopping in the food stalls among all the hustle and bustle of Christmas. We go to the cheese market, the fruit and vegetable stand, and the nut stalls. Never once to the grocery. She does all this while re-iterating that cooking for Christmas need not be stressful, just go with the flow.

To prepare for one of her parties, she places some short ribs in a cranberry sauce mixture and then puts them in the oven for her party later that evening. The ribs need to cook for one and a half hours. So as not to stand around and waste time Nigella flies out of her kitchen to go have pre-party drinks with her friends at a favorite pub. Now, I definitely think that is the thing to do to de-stress the cooking for a party. Later in the evening she is shown passing out the ribs wrapped in a paper napkin to each guest, no plates mind you. She lets us know to supply plenty of baby wipes too, for wiping up our sticky fingers. Baby wipes? Well what do I know! Her guests always are shown drinking a lot. I would too, that way I would not care that I dropped cranberry sauce all down the front of my cleavage, in my low cleavage red gown, and went the entire night that way.

She likes to cook with lots of spices and shops in various spice specialty shops. We follow her along as she shops. The spices come in little plastic bags and she keeps them in her pantry. Yes, you’ll see her pantry, her library, her upstairs, her downstairs and her kitchen in her cooking series. I feel like I live with Nigella I know her house so well. In one episode as she gets out the bags of spices and remarks about how long they keep, she looks at the expiration date on one of the packs. Oh, the spice expired about ten years ago!  Now weren’t we just at the spice shop? So, she just pitches it in the trash and moves on. Now haven’t we all been there? I guess that means another trip to the spice man. I think he may be selling more than spices!

Then there is the turkey episode which I liked a lot. She brings out this really, large red plastic bin, the size of a laundry basket to brine the turkey in. She adds several, and I mean several, spices, herbs, and clementines, to the brining salt concoction. She sets the turkey in the brining mixture outside for a day or two to meld. Meanwhile, she is making gingerbread stuffing from a store bought gingerbread cake. What?  When did she get this? I’ve been with her for all her shopping haven’t I? She says she likes to buy store bought foods and then build on them to save time and this is one of those times, I guess. Adding to the meal she makes her mother’s bread pudding, roasted Brussels sprouts, a crispy, roasted, red potato dish, (one of her favorites), and a mountain of merengue for dessert. And in-between all that she shows us how to decorate and set the festive Christmas table in the library, where she will be entertaining her guests on Christmas Eve no less. All under no stress and in the fine gown.

But, the best part of the show is the following morning, Christmas Day, when Nigella comes down to the kitchen, disheveled, hair tossed about, and wearing her bright red satin, Christmas dressing gown. She pulls out two chunks of thick white bread, slathers a great swag of gingerbread dressing on, followed by a layer of cranberry sauce, (she made that in another episode), then adds a layer of bread pudding and a layer of turkey and a few gherkins thrown in for good measure. She can not celebrate Christmas without gherkins! The sandwich is now about 4 inches thick and she chows down while leaning heavily on the counter. No, no Christmas cooking stress here! I love this show! 

Nigella Lawson

Nigella Lawson

PS I went and ordered the companion cook book containing her Christmas Cooking episodes to make sure I’d have all the stress free recipes! See you tomorrow for more Christmas Foods and Traditions!

Christmas Traditions: The Poor Chimney Sweep

Chimney Sweep in 1850

The Master Sweep in 1850 

In Victorian times everyone would want their chimney swept before Christmas. Today we see the chimney sweep displayed on holiday cards as a cherub little boy, broom in hand. But, do we really know what it was like to be a chimney sweep?

The chimney sweep was an essential part of London since 1200 when the customary fire in the middle of the room was replaced with a chimney. The reason for removing the soot and ash was to ensure a free flow of air; any blockage reduced the efficiency of the fire and the chimney itself could catch fire.

The soot was removed by the Master Sweep…… a man who was paid by the parish to teach orphans or paupers the craft, using children as young as four or five, who were boys or girls from the workhouse, or bought from their parents and then trained to climb the treacherous flues.  The children were totally reliant on him since their guardians had signed Papers of Indenture, which bound them to him until they were adults. It was the duty of the Poor Law guardians to apprentice as many children of the workhouses as possible, to reduce costs to the parish. The master sweeps’ duties were to teach the craft of chimney sweeping, provide the apprentice with a second suit of clothes, have him cleaned once a week, allow him to attend church and not send him up chimneys that were on fire. The apprentice agreed to obey the master sweeper and work at least 7 years when he then could become a journeyman sweep, and could work for the master sweep of his choice.  The child apprentice could be sold on to another sweep with prices ranging from 7 shillings (35 cents) to 4 guineas (4 dollars). This was a dangerous job with sweeps having to negotiate hot chimneys with flues 14 inches by 9 inches, the common standard. An apprentice would do four or five chimneys a day. When they first started they scraped their knees and elbows, so the master would harden up their skin by standing them close to a hot fire and rubbing in strong brine using a brush. This was done each evening until the skin hardened. The boys got no wages, but lived with the master who fed them. They slept together on the floor or in the cellar under the sacks and the cloth used during the day to catch the soot. This was known as “sleeping black.”

In the Industrial Age, buildings were higher and the new chimney tops were grouped together and the routes of flues could involve two or more right angles with horizontal and vertical sections. Buckingham Palace had one flue with 15 angles and the flue narrowed to 9 inches by 9 inches.

Soot was sold and used as manure.

Chimney sweeping was one of the most difficult, hazardous and low-paying occupations of the era. The boys could get stuck with their knees jammed against their chins. The harder they struggled the tighter they became wedged. They could remain in this position for many hours until they were pushed out from below or pulled out with a rope. If their struggling caused a fall of soot they would suffocate. Dead or alive the boy had to be removed and this would be done by removing bricks from the side of the chimney. There was also a high rate of testicular cancer and lung cancer among the boys.

It was 1875 before the practice was outlawed and from this time on the tradition of the chimney boys became romanticized. With the making of the hinged brush the profession became associated with good-natured, agile men as played by Dick Van Dyke in the movie Mary Poppins. The chorus from his song, Chim Chim Cher-ee shows the association of sweeps with good luck. “ Good luck will rub off when I shake ‘ands with you, or blow me a kiss…….and that’s lucky too.”

I think not! Nothing could be lucky for the chimney sweep!

See you tomorrow for more Christmas Foods and Traditions!

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