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Happy New Year!

Auld lang Syne

Auld lang Syne

It has been a wonderful year! Thank you to all my blogging friends, and friends on FB and Twitter! And those of you who follow me by email!

I wish you the best in 2017!

Here is the ‘New Blog’ as promised! Look Here! I will no longer be posting here, but you will still be able to view old posts.

Poke around and hit all the buttons on the new blog! Please let me know if something doesn’t work!

I look forward to all your posts and comments in the new year!

Cady Luck Leedy

 

 

Happy New Year’s Eve!

Happy New Year's Eve

This is the last post on this blog! I will now be moving over to my new blog at http//:www.thecadyluckleedy.com! I will still be writing about my travels and such, only there will be a new name and a new look! I hope you will continue to follow me there, because I would miss chatting with you all!

This blog will not go away, I have too much work in it. I just will not be adding anything new to this site. On the new blog you can switch back and forth from this blog to the new one! Awesome!

You can follow me by adding your email address in the blue area at the bottom of my new site. I think the FB and Twitter links will still work. Have a blessed and Happy New Year! CadyLuckLeedy

Thursday Doors: Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Last week I showed you some photos of my small town. Today, December 28th, it is absolutely a spring day, (high 60’s) so I am strolling the campus of Davidson College, the town’s backbone. In the spring of 1835 a small group of Presbyterian churchmen got together in the home of William Lee Davidson, a North Carolina militia general during the American Revolutionary War. The men wanted to build a college, but the designated property had to meet strict requirements. It had to be land between two thriving big cities, Charlotte and Statesville, and “remarkably healthful, being free from malaria and other local causes of sickness.” It would be established for the education of young men for the gospel ministry, as well as planned as a self supporting manual labor institution; meaning all the students at that time were obligated to work in the fields three hours a day in the Manual Labor program.

By 1840 there were four faculty members (one also served as president) and eighty students. Upon arrival each student would go to each professor, where they would be given an entrance exam in each subject.

The college was here first and the town was built up around the college. The original name of the town was Davidson College. The college owned so much property it was decided to dispose of some of the land opposite the campus, by selling lots for houses. They offered a 99 year lease and a great deal of control over the behavior of its tenants. Anyone leasing a lot “could not vend, barter, traffic, give or deal in any way in ardent spirits, wine, cider, gin, porter, ale or any other kind of intoxicating liquor.” Many of these lots were bought by the professors to build their homes on and in later years some of the larger homes were turned into boarding houses for the students.

The Davidson College Map

The Davidson College Map

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

Davidson Presbyterian Church on the Campus of Davidson College

The Doors of Davidson Presbyterian Church

The Doors of Davidson Presbyterian Church

Last week I photographed the one block shopping area of our town across from Davidson College. Here is a view of Main Street from the college!

A View of Town

A View of Town

The students raised most of the money to build the private meeting halls; the Philanthropic Literary Society Hall, and the Eumenean Literary Society Hall, where social life was centered. Most of the students belonged to one or the other with a passionate loyalty. Both buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Philanthropic Literary Society Hall

The Philanthropic Literary Society Hall

The Eumenean

The Eumenean Literary Society Hall

Close Up of the Eumeneum Literary Society Hall

Close Up of the Eumeneum Literary Society Hall

In 1837 there were three small dormitories to accommodate the students. Each narrow building had four separate rooms with each room opening to the outside. They were called, “The Rows”; Oak and Elm.

Elm Row, Davidson College

Elm Row, Davidson College

Elm Row

Elm Row

Elm Row

Elm Row

The Drinking Fountain

The Drinking Fountain

A View of the Presbyterian Church from Campus

A View of the Presbyterian Church from Campus

Really Big Oak Trees

Really Big Oak Trees

The Davidson College Library

The Chambers Building

The Chambers Building

The Chambers Building, Up Close and Personal

I wanted to photograph some of the newer buildings as well ……..

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

Davidson College

And the grounds feature an arboretum and the trees are tagged for identification.

Tagged Crepe Myrtle

Tagged Crepe Myrtle

Today, Davidson College is a liberal arts college dedicated to cultivating humane instincts and disciplined, creative minds. Their lingo not mine. I hope that means graduates will be able to get a job!

See you in the New Year!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

PS……………….The BIG NEWS!!!! I have been working on a new blog site since October! So I will introduce it on January 1st! I will no longer be posting on this site after January 1st, although it will remain up to view. I have 3 years of work on this blog, too much to let just disappear!! My new blog features my photos much better and on the computer the website fills the entire screen! I hated having all the wasted space in my background, although I loved the black, it made my photos POP!  Well, I was up for a change! So, I hope to continue to hear from all of you in the New Year! Look for me at https://www.The CadyLuckLeedy.com, BUT NOT UNTIL THE 1ST OF JANUARY!!!!!!

Big News

Big News

Thursday Doors: Christmas L.I.S.T. (Life In a Small Town)

Looking Down Main Street

Looking Down Main Street

Today we are celebrating Christmas Thursday Doors in my small spot of the world! The views are along Main Street, our shopping area, one short block, from one stop light to the next. There are only two stoplights in town! The shops are along just one side of the street. Across the street from the shops is the library and the “green” where concerts are held in the summer and the kids play football in the winter. I hope you enjoy the tour! Merry Christmas!

They say our town population is 11,000, but that includes a wide country/farm area too. I’d say about three thousand of us actually live within walking distance (a mile or so) of town. We do not get mail delivery. We must go to the post office and pick it up. Of course, that’s how we keep up with all the goings on!!

The Village Store

The Village Store

The Ladies’ Garden Club make the Christmas arrangements to hang all around town.

The Work of the Garden Club

The Work of the Garden Club

The doors can be left open today, as I took these pictures on Sunday, December 18, the temperature was 66 degrees!

Local, Affordable and Handmade

Local, Affordable and Handmade

Most of our restaurants have outdoor seating, although in the summer it is so hot here, it is too hot to sit outside unless it is very early or very late in the day! In the background is Davidson College.

Mestizo Restaurant

Mestizo Restaurant

You have to have a Bike Shop!

The Bike Shop

The Bike Shop

And the Davidson College Shop always looks cheerful! When the college is closed for breaks it is very quiet on the streets!

Already For Santa

All Ready For Santa!

Now this is the “real deal” bookstore!

Mainstreet Books

Mainstreet Books

Sign at Books

Sign at Mainstreet Books

And we have nice banners to display lest you forget where you are!

Christmas Davidson

Christmas In Davidson

Nandina

Nandina

Raefords Barber Shop is an institution in town, been here forever!

Raefords Barber Shop

Raefords Barber Shop

We got new signs a few years back!

Park Here!

Park Here!

Monkee’s, the ladies apparel shop.

Monkee's, You Might Need a Bigger Closet

Monkee’s, You Might Need a Bigger Closet

And finally, everyone needs a Pickled Peach!

The Pickled Peach

The Pickled Peach

I hope you have enjoyed my spot in the world! See you in the New Year!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

PS……………….The BIG NEWS!!!! I have been working on a new blog site since October! So I will introduce it on January 1st! I will no longer be posting on this site after January 1st, although it will remain up to view. I have 3 years of work on this blog, too much to let just disappear!! My new blog features my photos much better and on the computer the website fills the entire screen! I hated having all the wasted space in my background, although I loved the black, it made my photos POP!  Well I was up for a change! So I hope to continue to hear from all of you in the New Year! Look for me at https://www.ThatTravelLadyInHerShoes, a slight change in name!

Big News

Big News

 

 

 

Christmas Foods and Traditions: Snowflakes

The Perfect Snowflake!

The Perfect Snowflake!

Snowflakes are a collection of snow crystals which fall through the earth’s atmosphere in a range of temperatures and humidity fluctuations, developing an infinite number of shapes. Individual snowflakes differ in detail from one another, but may be categorized in eight broad classifications and at least 80 individual variants. The main shapes for ice crystals, from which combinations may occur, are needle, column, plate and rime. Snowflakes appear white in color despite being made of clear ice. The snowflake is often a traditional seasonal image or motif used around Christmas, especially in Europe, the United States and Canada. It represents the traditional White Christmas!

The Guinness Book of Records lists the largest snowflakes as those that fell on Fort Keogh, Montana, in January 1887, when a rancher reported snowflakes that were 15 inches wide and 8 inches thick!  Hmm, I am not sure about that………Was that rancher into the whiskey at the time?

Most people believe that each snowflake is unique in design despite the statistical possibility that identical flakes could exist and were recorded in Wisconsin in 1998. 

I have to admit I love to watch the snowflakes fall, as long as I am inside near the fireplace, with my hot chocolate and with nowhere to go. I do not like shoveling it or driving in it. And I do not like it when it piles up and turns that nasty grey, from dirt and slush refreezing!

Maybe the best snowflakes are the paper ones we cut out at school from folded white paper and then put on the windows! Do you remember making those?

Or the best of the best snowflake is the snowflake cookie! YUM! Those always look and taste perfect! See you tomorrow with more Christmas Foods and Traditions!

Christmas Traditions: The Postbox and Postman

The Post Box

The Post Box

Yesterday we learned about the first Christmas Card so it is fitting that we learn about the post-box and the postman today!

Letterboxes had been known in France from the beginning of the 17th century. In 1653, the first post boxes are believed to have been installed in and around Paris. By 1829, post boxes were in use throughout France. However, the roadside pillar-boxes associated with Great Britain rose to prominence during the Victorian era. 

In the UK, before the introduction of pillar-boxes, it was customary to take outgoing mail to the nearest letter receiving house or post office. Such houses were usually coaching inns or turnpike houses where the Royal Mail coach would stop to pick up and drop off mail and passengers. People took their letters, in person, to the receiver, or postmaster, purchased a stamp (after 1840) and handed over the letter.

Post boxes were first brought to the Channel Islands, at the suggestion of the novelist Anthony Trollope, who had been sent to the islands as a surveyor, by Sir Rowland Hill, Secretary of the Post Office. The problem was the collecting of mail on the islands due to the irregular sailing times of the Royal Mail packet boats, the weather, and the tides. Trollope reported back a recommendation to use a device he had seen in Paris, a “letter-receiving pillar.” It was made of cast iron, octagonal in design, and painted olive green. Trollope suggested that four would be needed for Guernsey and five for Jersey. Vaudin & Son Foundry, in Jersey, first produced them and the first four were placed in David Place, New Street, Cheapside, and St Clement’s Road in St Helier and were first used by the public in 1852. They were instantly popular despite problems with rainwater getting in the boxes!      

The first standard design was made by Richard Redgrave of the Department of Science and Art in 1856 and was immediately taken up for use in London and other major cities. Green was the usual color of the earliest Victorian post boxes.

A decade later the hexagonal, John Penfold Post Box, became the dominant design and from July 1874, there was a gradual adaptation of red as the color that the world would associate with the British pillar-box. Penfold boxes come in three sizes and altogether there are nine different types. The power of the pillar-box as a cultural icon made this particular red, called pillar-box red, particularly useful to the cosmetic industry when describing lipstick and hair color.

Most traditional British pillar boxes produced after 1905 are made of cast iron and are cylindrical. But, alas I did not have one picture of a cylindrical post box in all my pictures!

This summer while scurrying around the country lanes in Sussex looking for a particular garden in the NGS, (Gardens put on display once a year for charity) we came to a cluster of four lanes each going off in a different direction. AND here at the intersection of Nowhere and Nowhere was the Royal Post Box! I had to stop and get a picture!

The Lonely Post Box

The Lonely Post Box

And here is a post box in St Ives, convenient to the teas shoppes!

A Post Box in St Ives, Cornwall

A Post Box in St Ives, Cornwall

And here is another post box in another small village in the UK. Truly a post box!

The English Post Box

The English Post Box

Red is still the default color of British post-boxes, but in 2012 the London Olympics organizing committee celebrated British successes by painting selected boxes gold!

What we now refer to as a “penny-farthing,” those odd looking things with the outsized front wheel, was generally known to the Victorians as the bicycle. The nickname came about around 1891 when the machines were nearly outdated. The penny-farthing takes it’s name from two British coins, one larger than the other just like the two wheels.  In the 1890s the terms “ordinary” or “high wheel” were the preferred names for this type of bicycle and these are the terms used today by enthusiasts.

The Pentacycle Trialled at Horsham, Sussex

The Pentacycle Tested at Horsham, Sussex

The five wheeled bike that the postman used was known as the “Pentacycle.” It was the invention of the architect Edward Burstow in 1882. It was designed for the purpose of carrying mail and this was tested in the county of West Sussex. Although the innovation met with an enthusiastic response from the postmen of Horsham, the idea was not adopted elsewhere. There is a replica of one in the British Postal Museum.

I hope you have enjoyed the post boxes and mailman today! See you tomorrow for more in the Series, Christmas Foods and Traditions!!

The Elizabethan Christmas and the Tale of Oranges

The Elizabethan Christmas

The Elizabethan Christmas

To continue with my Christmas Foods And Traditions Series we will look today at the Elizabethan period of England.

As a queen, Elizabeth had access to some of the most luxurious foods that were on offer now from many parts of the world. Her food reflected the wealth and power of England and was an important status symbol.

Oranges were originally brought from China, but by the 16th century they were grown in Spain and southern France. During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, sweet oranges were given frequently as Christmas gifts because they were expensive, delicious and sure to note how wealthy the giver was.

Now to tell the Great Citrus Fruit Escape……………

Father John Gerard, a Jesuit priest, continued to practice Catholicism and move freely among the gentry in Elizabethan Protestant times, and that landed him eventually in the Tower of London.

A  well-to-do prisoner in the Tower was allowed to furnish their cell to their tastes and bring in their own food to make life there more tolerable. Father Gerard was gifted some oranges and he would share them with the guard and warden to bribe them. He persuaded the warden to allow him to send crosses made from the left-over orange peel to his friends.

Father Gerard's Orange Peel Crosses

Father Gerard’s Orange Peel Crosses

Along with the crosses he sent a prayer written in charcoal, which the warden would read first.

Father Gerard Prayer Written in Charcoal

Father Gerard Prayer Written in Charcoal

However, when the warden was not looking, Gerard used the orange juice that he had saved, to write a second message between the lines of the prayer. Once the orange juice was dried it became invisible, only to be seen when re-heated by lamplight fire. Father Gerard wrapped all the orange peel crosses in the paper prayer-messages and sent them with the guard to be delivered.

The Orange Juice Message Written Between the Lines

The Orange Juice Message Written Between the Lines

Also during this time, Father Gerard met fellow Catholic prisoner, John Arden, who was being kept in another part of the prison, near the garden and the moat.

While in the Tower Father Gerard was tortured, often being suspended for days by his wrists in the hope he would confess to treason and could be put to death. His fingers were barely able to move after this.

Gerard and Arden were given permission to spend some time in each other’s company. The coded messages had been deciphered by Father Gerard’s supporters and a desperate escape plan was put in place.  On the appointed evening, the men met in Arden’s cell and loosened the stone around the bolt of the door that lead to the roof. They reached the roof at midnight, in time to see a rowing boat containing three men approach the walls. As they were about to make contact, a man came from a house below and assuming the men were fishing, began to engage them in conversation.

Gerard waited patiently for the man to leave, but by the time he departed it was too late for an escape that night.

Thinking that the escape was doomed, Gerard was surprised to hear next day that the rescuers were going to try again. Waiting until they had been locked in the Tower together, Gerard and Arden again climbed onto the roof. Throwing down a weighted cord they raised up a rope that had been tied to it by the rescuers below. The plan had been to slide down the rope, but the angle it made meant that instead the escapers had to pull themselves hand over hand along its length. It is worth remembering that Gerard had recently been tortured by being suspended in manacles, which made a hazardous descent even more difficult.

After his companion managed to climb down, Gerard realized that the rope which had been straight was now sagging – making the climb even more difficult. Holding the rope between his legs, Gerard pulled himself out from the high roof. Half way across he became exhausted and at one point was left hanging in the darkness, strength failing. In the end Gerard and Arden managed to escape, all in thanks to his oranges!  Can you imagine? Is this where the saying “read between the lines“ comes from? I should think so!

More to come in the Christmas Foods And Traditions Series! Enjoy!

 

21 Steps of Honor

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington, VA

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington, VA

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier: What do you know about it?

1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the Tomb of the Unknowns and why? 21 steps

It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignity.

2. How long does he hesitate after his about face to begin his return walk and why?

21 seconds; for the same reason as Number 1.

3. Why are his gloves wet?

His gloves are moistened to prevent him from losing his grip on the rifle. 

4. Does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time and if not, why not?

He carries the rifle on the shoulder away from the tomb. After his march across the path, he executes an about face and moves the rifle to the outside shoulder.

5. How often are the guards changed?

Guards are changed every thirty minutes, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.

6. What are the physical traits of the guards limited to?

For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5′ 10″ and 6′ 2″ tall and his waist cannot exceed 30 inches. They must commit 2 years of life to guard the tomb, live in the barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink alcohol on or off duty for the rest of their lives. They cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives and cannot disgrace the uniform or the tomb in any way. After two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they have served as a guard of the tomb. There are only 400 presently worn. The guard must obey these rules for the rest of his life or give up the wreath pin. The shoes are specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal plates that extend to the top of the shoe in order to make the load click as they come to a halt. There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror. 

The first six months of duty a guard cannot talk to anyone nor watch TV. All off time duty is spent studying the 175 notable people laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. A Guard must memorize who they are and where they are interred. Among the notables are: President John F Kennedy,  Joe Lewis (the boxer), Medal of Honor recipient Audie L Murphy, the most decorated soldier of WWII, General George Patton IV, and many others.

Every guard spends five hours a day getting his uniforms ready for guard duty. In 2003 as Hurricane Isabelle was approaching Washington, DC, our US Senate and House took two days off from the anticipation of the dangers from the storm. The military members assigned the duty of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were given permission to suspend their assignment. They respectfully declined. Soaked to the skin, marching in the pelting rain of a tropical storm, they said that guarding the Tomb was not just an assignment; it was the highest honor that can be afforded to a service person. The Tomb has been patrolled continuously, 24/7, since 1930. Let us remember the guards this day and the Unknown Soldier.

ETERNAL REST GRANT THEM O LORD AND LET PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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