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Thursday Doors: Père LaChaise Cemetery, Paris, France

Père LaChaise Cemetery

Père LaChaise Cemetery

Today, I thought I would do something different for Thursday Doors. This is a video I made of Père LaChaise Cemetery in Paris, France! Lots of doors here!

The cemetery is named after Father Francois de la Chaise, (1624-1709) the confessor to Louis XIV, who lived in the Jesuit house that was on the property at one time.  The sight opened as a cemetery on May 21, 1804 with the burial of a five year old child. That first year only thirteen people were buried here because it was felt the cemetery was too far from Paris. Also, Catholics would not be buried here because the Catholic Church had not blessed it. Later in 1804, with great fanfare, the decision was made to transfer the remains of Jean de La Fontaine (poet) and Molière (actor/writer), seen as rock stars in their day, to the cemetery.  Again in 1817, the purported remains of Abélard (philosopher) and Héloise d’Argenteuil (his lover) were also transferred with their monument’s canopy made from fragments of an abbey. This strategy led to the desired results: people were determined to be buried among the famous citizens.  The famous and wealthy people buried here would try to out do each other, even in death, with beautiful burial chambers, most the size of a phone booth, but some very extravagant.  Père Lachaise was expanded five times and today over one million bodies are buried here in 110 acres. Many, many more are in the columbarium, which holds the remains of those who have requested cremation.

Today, strict rules apply to be buried in the cemetery.  To be buried here one must have died in Paris or lived there. Also there are 50, 30 and 10 year leases on the burial sites. After the lease is up the remains are removed and placed in Aux Morts, (to the Dead) an ossuary, similar to the famous catacomb sights.  When the ossuary is full, the bones are cremated and then returned to the sight. I wanted to see the graves of Jim Morrison, Edith Piaf, and Oscar Wilde. A roster of all the famous people buried here can be found on the internet. I would suggest taking a map of the cemetery with you or download the Maplet of Père Lachaise Cemetery on your IPhone as we had. After all there are 110 acres to explore and it is very steep and uneven with forest like ledges in some areas. Also note, that at 4pm in the winter, bell ringers ringing old fashioned school bells, walk the cemetery to announce that the cemetery closes at 5pm. You do not want to be locked in the cemetery left to scale a 20 foot gate!  I hope you enjoy the video!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

Thursday Doors: Prague

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague,  The Czech Republic

Prague is an architect’s dream! You can’t just take a picture of a door here without getting the scope of the entire building! What beauty! It is quite the tourist destination so many photos will also feature Tourists! I took these photos before I got into the habit of getting up early to take photos before the tourists arrived!

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague is a blend of old and new. This pink building is a motorcycle shop!

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

Prague is a place of many doorways to another doorway! And I love all the cobbled, tiny streets! This was the way to our hotel…….

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

And this was the door to the hotel!

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, The Czech Republic

And there is a door on the famous Prague Astronomical Clock!

The Astonomical Clock, Prague, Czech Republic

The Astronomical Clock, Prague, Czech Republic

The medieval astronomical clock can be found in Old Town Square. Legend says Hanus, the clockmaker, made the clock that was so admired by everyone, but he refused to show anyone how it was made. When he decided to build an even better clock the city officials became jealous and blinded him so he could not finish the clock. He then damaged the astronomical clock in revenge, and no-one was able to repair it.

The Real history of the clock is this. In 1961 an old document was found which described the clock and said it was made by Mikulas of Kadan in 1410.  It was repaired and improved over the centuries, but eventually it was so faulty, it was mostly not working at all, and by 1780 it stopped working altogether. In 1865 major repairs were made to the clock and in 1945 the clock was damaged heavily during the war.  After the war the clock was repaired and the striking of the clock was changed from Old Czech Time to the Central European Time.

The wooden figures of the apostles appear in the windows every hour and some of the other sculptures move. Death holds an hourglass, vanity is a man with a mirror, Miserliness is a man with a moneybag. There is also an astronomer, chronicler, philosopher and angel. When the apostles finish their journey, the golden rooster crows and flaps his wings, the bell rings, and the clock strikes the hour.

The Astronomical Dial shows the medieval perception of the Universe: the Earth is the center. The blue part of the dial represents the sky above the horizon, the brown part the sky below it.

There are three circles on the dial showing different times. The outer circle shows Italian time and the inner circle shows “Babylonian Time,” the length of an hour differs there according to season……longer in summer and shorter in winter. This clock is the only one in the world that measures it. The little star by the zodiac ring shows the fixed stars.

The newest part of the clock is the Calendar Dial. There is the Prague Old Town symbol in the centre. The rotary outer circle describes every single day of the year, and the current date is indicated at the top. There are also medallions with zodiac signs and pictures depicting every month. Wow, this is quite the clock!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

Reason to Love St Ives # 7: Sculpture and Barbara Hepworth Garden

The Walkway Above the Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Walkway Above the Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Entire Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Entire Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

Trewyn House, St Ives

Trewyn House, St Ives

During the Secret Garden Tour there was a lovely garden space that was the largest piece of turf that we saw in St Ives, that was devoted to a garden. The garden had a locked gate, and I got the feeling it was opened only on special occasions, hence for the Secret Garden Tour. Across from the garden a small lane divided the garden from one of the most unusual gates that I have ever seen. Behind that beautiful gate is the Barbara Hepworth Sculpture Garden or also known as Trewyn House.

Dame Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth DBE was an English artist and sculptor. Her work exemplifies Modernism and in particular modern sculpture. She was one of the few female artists to achieve international prominence.  Hepworth was a leading figure in the colony of artists who resided in St Ives during the Second World War.

Barbara Hepworth first came to live in Cornwall with her husband Ben Nicholson and their young family at the outbreak of war in 1939. She lived and worked in Trewyn studios – now the Barbara Hepworth Museum – from 1949 until her death in 1975, from a fire in the studio. Following her wish to establish her home and studio as a museum of her work, Trewyn Studio and much of the artist’s work remaining there was given to the nation and placed in the care of the Tate Gallery in 1980.

‘Finding Trewyn Studio was a sort of magic’, wrote Barbara Hepworth. ‘Here was a studio, a yard and garden where I could work in open air and space.’ When she first arrived at Trewyn Studio, Hepworth was still largely preoccupied with stone and wood carving, but during the 1950s she increasingly made sculpture in bronze as well. This led her to create works on a more monumental scale, for which she used the garden as a viewing area.

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

Most of the bronzes are in the positions in which the artist herself placed them. The garden itself was laid out by Barbara Hepworth with help from a friend, the composer, Priaulx Rainier.

"Figure for Landscape" 1959-60 Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

“Figure for Landscape” 1959-60, Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

Garden Sculpture (Model for Meridian) 1958 Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

Garden Sculpture (Model for Meridian)1958, Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

"Conversation with Magic Stones" 1973 Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975 Accepted by HM Government in lieu of tax and allocated to the Tate Museum

“Conversation with Magic Stones” 1973, Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

Her eldest son, Paul, was killed on February 13, 1953 in a plane crash while serving with the Royal Air Force in Thailand. A memorial to him, Madonna and Child, is in the parish Church of St Ives.

Exhausted in part from her son’s death, Hepworth travelled to Greece with her good friend Margaret Gardiner in August 1954.

When Hepworth returned to St Ives from Greece, she found that Gardiner had sent her a large shipment of Nigerian guarea hardwood. Although she received only a single tree trunk, Hepworth noted that the shipment from Nigeria to the Tilbury docks came in at 17 tons. Between 1954-1956 Hepworth sculpted six pieces out of this guarea wood!

It was proposed at one time to take up the garden and use the land to build council housing! I for one am glad they didn’t, it is a calming oasis is a sea of tourists.

HEPWORTH Barbara, 1966, sculpteur (GB) © ERLING MANDELMANN ©

HEPWORTH Barbara, 1966, sculpteur (GB)
© ERLING MANDELMANN ©

 

Thursday Doors; St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

I’ve got lots of doors from St Ives!!!! So here are some doors and some cottages thrown in to boot! Fantastic place for DOORS! For most of these doors Mind Your Head and Mind the Gap!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Notice that many of the doors in these pictures are surrounded by pipes of some kind!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Red seems to be a very popular color here for a door!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwal

 

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Many doors come with tiny, tiny cottages!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Many doors have fancy stuff on them!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

And some have tell-all signs and door knockers! This sign says “Dog” and the knocker is a wolf.

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Some have fancy knockers and a door handle a foot off the ground!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Some have fancy covers!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

And some are just darling!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Something tells me the door frame was added much later!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

Some just never want to give up the boat!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

And some never want to be painted!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

And some are salty and crusted!

St Ives, Cornwall

St Ives, Cornwall

And some have fancy wrought iron AND studs!

I hope you enjoyed this weeks doors from St Ives in Cornwall, UK! More to come next week from St Ives!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

 

 

Thursday Doors at Tintinhull

Tintinhull, A National Trust Property in Somerset, UK

Tintinhull, A National Trust Property in Somerset, UK

Main Entrance at Tintinhull

Main Entrance at Tintinhull

The Boxwood Entrance at Tintinhull

The Boxwood Entrance at Tintinhull, Notice the Diamond Shaped Stone Walkway

Tintinhull, a National Trust property in Somerset, was our second stop of the day on our way to Cornwall.

Keep in mind that finding a particular National Trust property makes some of the best adventures! They are usually off the beaten path and although are addressed in small villages many times I never find the small village!

Tintinhull, is a small, tidy property that just fits the bill. By 1630 the Napper family had constructed the east side of the present house, and this was extended by Andrew Napper in 1722 when the classical west facade and forecourt were built. In about 1900 Tintinhull was sold to Dr S J M Price. He developed the west forecourt as a garden, laying the distinctive diamond-patterned flagged walk and planting the flanking clipped domes of boxwood. Notice the big eagles on the wall too! In 1933 Tintinhull was sold to Captain and Mrs P.E. Reiss, who developed garden enclosures linked by carefully designed vistas and rich planting. Phyllis Emily Reiss created a garden around the 17th century manor house, with six compartments, each room having it’s own character and identity, divided by clipped hedges and walls. She designed the Pool Garden as a memorial to a nephew killed in WWII. The house, gardens and woodland walk create all the charm at Tintinhull!

In July 1939 Reiss made two broadcasts for the BBC entitled ‘In my Garden.’ In 1959 she gave Tintinhull to the National Trust although she lived there until her death on the 18th September 1961.   

Penelope Hobhouse and her husband, Professor John Malins lived at Tintinhull for fourteen years and was in charge of the gardens there from 1980 until 1993. With a name like Penelope Hobhouse, (my auto spelling corrector wants to name her Penelope Hothouse) it’s a given that she was a garden writer, garden historian, self taught gardener and lecturer. She went on to design many gardens in England, Scotland, France, Italy, Spain, Germany and the United States. I especially like her name and I think it is perfect for a gardener! She has written several garden books, and Penelope Hobhouse on Gardening, written in 1994, describes her gardening experiences at Tintinhull.  You can find a video of her Here.

Now let’s take a look at Tintinhull!

The Garden Map at Tintinhull

The Garden Map at Tintinhull

Birds on the Wall Is Always Good!

Birds on the Wall Is Always Good!

Another Entrance to Tintinhull

Another Entrance to Tintinhull

A Very Small Door at Tintinhull

A Very Small Door at Tintinhull

How about this very small door! Was it an opening to a guard shack? Did you drop off the mail here? What was it used for?

A Few Doors to be Seen Here!

A Few Doors to be Seen Here!

i LOVE the Color of the Stone Too!

I LOVE the Color of the Stone Too!

Penelope Hobhouse was noted for her Terra Cotta planters! And I don’t want to miss the windows either!

Somme Window Treatment at Tintinhull

Some Window Treatment at Tintinhull

Another Door and Some More Pots!

Another Door, More Windows and Some More Pots!

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

Only two rooms are open for viewing at Tintinhull. Short, sweet, and modest!

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull, with Very Deep Doorways!

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

The Barn Tea Room Entrance Doors at Tintinhull

The Barn Tea Room Entrance Doors at Tintinhull

Inside the Tearoom at Tintinhull

Inside the Tearoom at Tintinhull

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhul

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

 

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhul

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

Did you find the doorways in the garden?

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

This section of Row Houses must refer to the village at Tintinhull! This is the only “village” I saw! Loved their cottage gardens and what else? More Red Doors!

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

 

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

It’s a Sign!

The White Horse Pub

The White Horse Inn, Hailsham, UK

Posting one last time about the Hoare Family, Stourhead and interesting tidbits………….that led from one thing to another!

When Richard Hoare, Goldsmith, moved his shop from Cheapside to Fleet Street he took his trading sign with him, that of the Golden Bottle, which was a gilded leather bottle that hung outside the shop. This sign was used to distinguish his business from another.

I am fascinated with the signs in the UK. Everyone has a sign!  Cottages in the villages have signs rather than numbered addresses and looking for cottage signs and pub signs while visiting there is very enjoyable!

But how did all this sign business start?  Well, with the Romans! In 43 AD, it was traditional for landlords, in Rome, to hang branches of vine leaves outside their premises to promote the drinking of wine within. People could not read, so an image that made sense was needed. When one saw the grape vines, one thought of grapes and then wine! Voila a sign! However, when the Romans got to the UK, they were lacking the customary vine leaf and hung any kind of evergreen plant over the door instead. The Romans built an extensive road network and with large numbers of troop movements, inns opened at suitable stopping points. Hence the beginnings of the local pub!

By the 12th century people were doing pilgrimages to cathedral towns, such as to the shrine of Thomas Beckett in Canterbury. As Chaucer’s pilgrims in the Canterbury Tales reveal, the pilgrims started their journey at the Tabard Inn in London. Other inns and taverns welcomed pilgrims and knights on their way to the Crusades in the Holy Land.

Pub signs as we know them today were originated with the Royal Act of 1393 when Richard II declared that anyone brewing ale in a town, with the intention of selling it, must hang out a sign or forfeit his ale.

It was Charles I who gave people the right to hang out signs as they pleased.  Prior to that signs were for innkeepers only. So an elaborate language of symbols began with a common understanding. Most common was a dragon for an apothecary, a sugar loaf for a grocer, a wheatsheaf for a baker, a frying pan for a confectioner and a spool for a silk weaver, or in the case of goldsmith, Hoare, the leather sack of gems.

By the 18th Century heavy wrought iron brackets with their sign hung outside every single establishment in Cheapside. During bad weather or a strong wind, these huge signs groaned and creaked and in 1718 a huge sign collapsed killing four people and took out much of the shop front. There was such a problem of hanging signs crowding the streets and knocking people from their horses, that a commission was formed in 1762 to take them all down and fix them to the store fronts. So that became the standard system to identify properties.

But, the British like their traditions and I am glad many, many shops, pubs and cottages use the hanging of signs to identify their property, albeit with lighter, smaller signs!

Here are some of my pub signs collected during my “Garden Tours of England.”

The Bucket of Blood, Cornwall, UK

The Bucket of Blood, Cornwall, UK

According to local folklore, the Bucket of Blood got its name many years ago when the landlord went to the well to get a bucket of water, but found a bucket of blood.  Investigating  further he found there was the badly mutilated corpse of a local smuggler at the bottom of the well! An alternative theory is that the well on the grounds would provide red water due to run off from local tin mining.

Downlong Cottage, St Ives, Cornwall, UK

Downlong Cottage, St Ives, Cornwall, UK

The Mermaid Restaurant, St Ives

The Mermaid Restaurant, St Ives

The Golden Lion, St Ives

The Golden Lion, St Ives

Warninglid Village Sign, UK

Warninglid Village Sign, UK

The Wolfpack Inn, Tenterden, UK

The Woolpack Inn, Tenterden, UK

The Star Inn, Alfriston, UK

The Star Inn, Alfriston, UK

The George Inn, Alfriston, UK

The George Inn, Alfriston, UK

The Bull Inn , Benenden

The Bull Inn, Benenden, Uk

These were a few of my favorite signs! I hope you enjoyed learning about them! See you soon!

The Hoare House, aka Stourhead, a National Trust Estate

Stourhead

Stourhead

Stourhead

Stourhead

Stourhead

Stourhead

I’m back from my “Garden Tour of England” and as you have learned from the previous post, written by the garden fairies here at The End Cottage, we are caught up with my own garden chores and all the guests are back home! Hence the delay in sharing my adventure!

It takes me months to plan which National Trust properties I will visit. After I decide on the properties I determine as many public and private gardens as I can in close proximity to the National Trust sights that I have picked out, and voila, my schedule of touring is complete! There is so much to see and do! So, let’s take a walk through the grounds and home of the Hoare family, here at Stourhead. It is the first of many delights this year on my Garden Tour of England. I have separated the posts into the house and to follow, the gardens.

The Story of Harry……… really it starts with all those Henrys and Richards in the Hoare family, who had nicknames of “good,” “magnificent,” and “naughty” to tell them apart. Sir Richard Hoare, was a goldsmith, in 1673, in London. Goldsmiths had secure premises and were the storehouses for cash and valuables so they were in a unique position to start a system of banking: lending their customers money for interest. He was granted the Freedom of the Goldsmith’s Company on July 5th, 1672 and this marked the foundation of the Hoare’s Bank. He was knighted by Queen Anne in 1702 and then became Lord Mayor of London in 1712. His son, Good Henry, was a partner in the family bank, Hoare and Co. Henry the Good, lived at the bank during the week and wanted a country estate for holidays and leisure. In 1717 he bought the medieval Stourton estate for 14,000 pounds and renamed it Stourhead after the source of the Stour River. He built Stourhead House based on a 16th century Venetian villa, but died before his grand design was completed.  Henry Hoare, “the Magnificent,” grandson of Richard, and son of Henry the Good, dominated the family with his wealth and personal charisma and was a great patron of the arts. He expanded the estate and the gardens that were considered a showcase. The garden was completed in 1770 and it’s fame spread quickly and became a must see destination with the breathtaking landscape and classical temples set around the lake. The grounds included a Grotto, a Gothic Cottage, the Pantheon, the Temple of Apollo, and the Temple of Flora.

Temple of Apollo, Stourhead

Temple of Apollo, Stourhead

Sir Henry Ainslie Hoare (perhaps the naughty) and his wife Augusta inherited Stourhead in 1883, but it soon spiraled into decay when costs grew impossible to manage, because she loved living in the country and he preferred city life. Ainslie’s flamboyant lifestyle forced him to leave the bank and auction Stourhead paintings, furniture and books. He left Stourhead in 1885.

In 1894, after the death of his cousin, Henry Hugh Arthur Hoare and his wife Alda, inherited the unoccupied house that had sat empty for 10 years and the 2,650 acre estate with the run down, neglected and overgrown gardens. They decided to pack up and leave their home, Wavendom in Buckinghamshire, and move with their son, Harry Hoare, to Stourhead, to create a special home for their only son. Harry and his parents loved the estate and worked hard to make it the beauty it once had been.

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Entrance Hall at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Entrance Hall at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Entrance Hall at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Entrance Hall at Stourhead

The Library at Stourhead

The Library at Stourhead

The Library at Stourhead

The Library at Stourhead

Little Dining Room at Stourhead

Little Dining Room at Stourhead

Little Dining Room at Stourhead

Little Dining Room at Stourhead

The Italian Room at Stourhead

The Column Room at Stourhead

The Italian Room at Stourhead

The Column Room at Stourhead

Ornate Cabinet in the Column Room, Stourhead

Ornate Cabinet in the Cabinet Room, Stourhead

I love that Poppy Red Color!

Detail of Ornate Cabinet in the Column Room, Stourhead

Detail of Ornate Cabinet in the Cabinet Room, Stourhead

An Ornate Cabinet in the Cabinet Room at Stourhead

An Ornate Cabinet in the Cabinet Room at Stourhead

The Italian Room at Stourhead

The Italian Room at Stourhead

The Italian Room at Stourhead

The Italian Room at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

The Picture Gallery at Stourhead

Fancy Way of Saying, DO NOT SIT at Stourhead

Fancy Way of Saying, DO NOT SIT at Stourhead

In 1902, a fire broke out in a chimney and burned for hours. The center of the house collapsed from the attic down to the cellars. The family, servants, gardeners, estate workers and farm hands worked to salvage as much as possible from the burning building. Paintings were cut from their frames and furniture was thrown out of windows. The Hoares worked again to restore the house they so loved, especially  for Harry, since he had grown up here and loved every inch of the place and this would always be his home. As you can see from the many rooms of Stourhead, saving everything would have been quite a challenge! It was vast with huge collections of Everything!

On August 1, 1914, Harry joined the Dorset Yeomanry and within a week he was no longer the estate manager, working for his father, but a soldier fighting for his country. His military career was plagued with injury and ill health and every time he was taken ill he would return to Stourhead to be cared for by his parents. After each recovery Harry returned to the battlefield.

During WWI the house and grounds were opened to the “Tommies” from the nearby Red Cross Hospital at Mere. Alda made arrangement for the soldiers to have outings on the property. Especially popular with the men was  fishing in the Flora Bay and afterwards Alda would serve tea to all the boys at The Flora Temple. Flowers, grapes and vegetables were also sent to support the troops at the hospital.

On December 19, 1917, Captain Henry Holt Arthur Hoare (Harry), was shot in the lungs at the Battle of El Mugher in Palestine and died of his wounds in Raseltin Hospital in Alexandria. He was buried in the Hadra Military Cemetery there. Harry’s parents were devastated after his untimely death and made plans to bequeath the home and grounds to charity, opening the estate to visitors. On show days visitors were shown around by the butler or the head housemaid, following strict rules. In 1946, one year before the death of Harry’s father, the estate was split and half was gifted to the National Trust and half remains in family ownership.

Visiting this extraordinary house and gardens was made that much more interesting by learning about the family, the house and grounds. That’s what makes the estates in the National Trust so interesting, they are preserving History! Particularly fun was the large display of 19th century women’s hats found in the estate ticket office! Women and children spent a lot of time trying on the hats and primping in front of the mirrors! A first for me in a National Trust property!

Hoare and Co. is the oldest private bank in the United Kingdom. As the business prospered it was moved to 37 Fleet Street, where it still is today and run by the 11th generation of Hoare’s direct descendants.

Next we’ll visit the Gardens at Stourhead! See you there!

Thursday Doors; The Hidden Doors of Italy

 

 Italian Door

New Doors Set into Old Door Opening

 Italian Door

Italian Door Blocked Up

Blocked Up Italian Door

Blocked Up Italian Door

 Italian Door

The Wrought Iron Italian Door Covering

New Very Narrow Italian Door

New Very Narrow Italian Door

Today for Door Day I thought we might look at some more of the fascinating Italian Doors! Sometimes when I am looking for doors I come upon doors that look like there have been different doors in that spot in the past and new doors have taken their place for whatever reason. I always wonder what was the previous door like? Some have an arch where the door would have been and some entrances have been bricked up!

 Italian Door

Italian Church Door Within a Door

Then there are the doors within the door.  I see these quite frequently at churches. The main doors are massive and quite heavy, so there is a little door in the big door, making it easier to pass through. Look for the pull, that is still above your shoulder! The heavy, giant, door usually has a bolt system on the inside. Is it to keep out unwanted guests?

 Italian Door

New Italian Door

And then there is the door that looks like it is in the mouth of a grotto!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Architecture

Many Layers of Corneglia, Italy

Many Layers and repairs of Archtecture, Corniglia, Italy

Won’t you join in? I’m doing Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge!

 

Thursday Doors: May 19th, 2016

A Stroll Through Orvieto, Italy

A Stroll Through Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

Orvieto, Italy is a dream come true.  From the train it is hardly noticed as one flies by from Rome to Florence. But getting off the train at Orvieto is well worth it. The location of the city rises above the almost-vertical faces of tuff cliffs that are completed by defensive walls built of the same stone called Tufa. Renting one of the nicest apartments we’ve ever had in Europe we arrived during their biggest festival of the year, Festa del Corpus Domini. Our hostess thought that was the reason we were there. We didn’t know anything about it, and thought how fortunate we were to be there for the festival. This Etruscan town is also noted for it’s woodworking and many doors feature their hand made pieces of art.  One thing you will never forget is the fragrance of jasmine from the vines that sweep across the door entrances or along many of the walls!  Enjoy!

The Swags of Jasmine Over the Doors in Orvieto, Italy

The Swags of Jasmine Over the Doors in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

I made a video presenting some of the doors of Orvieto and the spectacular surroundings

The Streets of Orvieto, Italy

There is also an underground city underneath Orvieto. Many of the homes of the noble families had a means of escape from the elevated city during times of siege, through secret escape tunnels carved in the soft rock. There was also an underground well dug to supply the town with water.

Underground Orvieto, Italy

Underground Orvieto, Italy

The Duomo or Cathedral of Orvieto, was built on the main square of the town starting in the 12th century for Pope Hadrian IV. It is huge! The side walls are made of horizontal stripes of dark green and white marble! How about that for a door? Look at the size of the people in comparison!

The Duomo in Orvieto, Italy

The Duomo in Orvieto, Italy

Here is the part of town where the people live!

Streets of Orvieto, italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Visiting Orvieto is a good way to experience Italy without all the bustle. There are several museums tracing the history of the town, fine eating, shops with well made, hand-made goods, and lovely people! Orvieto is a great place to stop! To find out more about Orvieto check out my other blog posts and videos featuring the Festa del Corpus Domini and things to do in Orvieto!

I hope you enjoyed our walk through Orvieto! This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

 

 

 

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