Travel, Gardens, Food, Photography, Books, Shoes

Posts from the ‘West Hoathly’ category

Color Your World: 120 Days of Crayola: Blue Violet

The Blue Violet Flowers

The Blue Violet Flowers

 

A Beautiful Garden in West Hoathly, UK

A Beautiful Garden in West Hoathly, UK

I do not know what these flowers are. I think they are primroses. They were a beautiful iridescent Blue Violet! It was just one of thousands of beautiful plants that I saw in the English gardens on my English Garden Tour 2015! 

Just to let you know, I’ve been thinking of what I would do with the lottery money that now is up to over 1 billion. One of the things I would do is purchase a garden and lovely little cottage in the UK and hang out with gardening friends that know all the latin names of flowers. Perhaps they would have a class on such at the local Woman’s Institute meeting, for transplants like me, who would like to be in the know. I can only dream! Well, maybe I could start on one flower. If the flower shown is a primrose, it is called primula vulgaris. How could anything so beautiful be vulgar?

This post is just one of many in the Color Your World: 120 Days of Crayola Challenge! Enjoy!

English Garden Tour, Garden Picture of the Day, the Terrace at Luctons

I have so many beautiful pictures from the gardens on the National Garden Scheme in the UK. I called my visit to the gardens, “The English Garden Tour.” Local gardeners open their gardens once a year for charity. Luctons, in Sussex, is a must see! Can’t you just imagine sitting at the end of the day in this garden? I can!

Luctons Garden on the National Garden Scheme, UK

Luctons Garden on the National Garden Scheme, UK

The English Garden Tour; Garden 2, Luctons in West Hoathly

The Back Lawn of Luctons

The Back Lawn of Luctons, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Back Lawn of Luctons, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Back Lawn of Luctons, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Back Lawn of Luctons

The Back Lawn of Luctons, West Hoathly, Sussex

It was so entertaining sitting on the terrace at the Cat Inn in West Hoathly watching the wedding guests stroll in for a wedding lunch. Such beautiful summer finery and oh the hats! Why don’t we wear hats anymore? I am always so envious of women in hats! So elegant looking in the smallest of fluff and feather!

Time to move on to the next garden, Luctons, just a short walk to the end of the street where the “newer homes” are. Talking with the owners, who have lived in their home for thirty years, we find there have been many adjustments and improvements to their 19th century home, green houses and two acre garden.

Herbaceous Borders at Luctons, Sussex

Herbaceous Borders at Luctons, Sussex

The Flower Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Flower Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Flowers of Luctons, Sussex

The Flowers of Luctons, Sussex

The Flowers of Luctons, Sussex

The Flowers of Luctons, Sussex

The Flower Garden of Luctons, Sussex

The Flower Garden of Luctons, Sussex

The Flowers of Luctons, Sussex

The Flowers of Luctons, Sussex

That is what I find so interesting about the gardens I have seen so far. You get a chance to talk with the gardeners/owners of the gardens and learn more about their garden plans, choice of flowers and involvement with other gardens and gardeners.   This garden was designed in the Gertrude Jekyll style, which focused on a relationship between the house and its surroundings. Gertrude Jekyll’s style included foliage, color and texture to achieve a practical and beautiful view. To give a picturesque and natural appearance in the garden the use of  stone walls, walkways, and natural partitioning of the garden, ensures a gentle flow. To quote the famous landscape gardener,” A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness: it teaches industry and thrift; it teaches entire trust.” At Luctons, we see the small box partere, yew topiary, shrubs and flowers that frame the front of the home giving it an inviting entrance. Won’t you join me for careful watchfulness?

The Front Entrance to Luctons, Sussex

The Front Entrance to Luctons, Sussex

The Front Entrance to Luctons, Sussex

The Front Entrance to Luctons, Sussex

The Front Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Front Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Front Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Front Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Front Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Front Garden at Luctons, Sussex

The Peacock Topiary, Luctons, Sussex

The Peacock Topiary, Luctons, Sussex

In the back is a large lawn with herbaceous borders centered in a large fruit and vegetable garden.

Leading to the Cricket Court at Luctons, Sussex

Leading to the Cricket Court at Luctons, Sussex

The Vegetable Garden, Luctons, Sussex

The Vegetable Garden, Luctons, Sussex

The wild flower orchard is not mowed revealing beautiful meadow flowers and spotted orchids.  A tent has been set up where cream teas are served.  Could there be anything more English? All I need is my hat!

Tea in the Garden, Luctons, Sussex

Tea in the Garden, Luctons, Sussex

Looking at the Orchard at Luctons, Sussex

Looking at the Orchard at Luctons, Sussex

Spotted Orchids in the Meadow at Luctons, Sussex

Spotted Orchids in the Meadow at Luctons, Sussex

The Lovely Unknown

The Lovely Unknown

PS This was hands down my favorite flower! I saw it in many of the gardens we toured, but could never find out the name of it. Can anyone identify it for me?

The English Garden Tour: Garden 1; The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

Map of Center of Village, West Hoathly, Sussex

Map of Center of Village, West Hoathly, Sussex

Today we traveled to West Hoathly, in Sussex, to see the first gardens that I had chosen from the many offered this weekend on the National Garden Scheme. Driving well over an hour we arrived in the center of the small village of 9 homes, including the pub. The Priest House is our first destination. The only one of its kind open to the public, this 15th century Wealden hall house stands in a traditional cottage garden on the edge of the Ashdown Forest. Originally owned by Henry VIII it was given to Anne of Cleaves, wife number four, upon their divorce. The herb garden is planted with over 170 culinary, medicinal and household herbs. Today a special exhibition for the NGS, featured on the upper floor, built in 1600, reveals pictures of local children and their place in the workforce in the 19th century. Many children, as young as five and six, were farm laborers and chimney sweeps. It was not uncommon for the chimney sweep to get stuck in the chimney and die. The Priest House is maintained by the Sussex Archaeological Society and provides rotating exhibits, research, and other learning experiences.

Walkway to the Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

Walkway to the Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gardens at Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gardens at Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gardens at Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gardens at Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gardens at Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gardens at Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

Flowers in the Garden at Priest House, Sussex

Flowers in the Garden at Priest House, Sussex

Another Garden at The Priest House, Sussex

Another Garden at The Priest House, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Priest House, West Hoathly, Sussex

St Margaret’s Church, settled in 1090, records the names of the village from Hadlega, later standardized to Hodlegh, then West Hoathly. This Anglo-Saxon word signifies a heath covered clearing, or the dense woodland of the Ashdown Forest. In 1556, Ann Tree was burnt at the stake near here for refusing to renounce Protestantism, one of seventeen martyrs to suffer this fate in Sussex. A brass memorial in the church commemorates her.

St Margaret's Church, West Hoathly, Sussex

St Margaret’s Church, West Hoathly, Sussex

St Margaret's Church, West Hoathlu, Sussex

St Margaret’s Church, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gate to St Margaret's Church, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Gate to St Margaret’s Church, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Manor House was built in 1627 for Mrs Catherine Infield of Gravetye Manor, as a dower house.  Her family was the wealthy owners of the local iron works. Later abandoned to smugglers the buildings and grounds were rejuvenated in 1884 when “the greatest English Gardener” William Robinson bought it. Upon his death it was turned over to the Forestry Commission. It now sits vacant and forlorn.

The Manor House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Manor House, West Hoathly, Sussex

Looking Through the Gate to the Manor House, West Hoathly, Sussex

Looking Through the Gate to the Manor House, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Phlox and Rose Cottages are 19th century weather boarded over timber framed cottages. They were the newest houses in the village!

Rose Cottage and Phlox Cottage, West Hoathly, Sussex

Rose Cottage and Phlox Cottage, West Hoathly, Sussex

Rose Cottage and Phlox Cottage, West Hoathly, Sussex

Rose Cottage and Phlox Cottage, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Upper Pendent is a timber framed, tile-hung 17th century home which previously housed the village stores and post office in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Upper Pendent, west Hoathly, Sussex

Upper Pendent, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Cat Inn is the 16th century pub of medieval origin standing in the crossroads of the village. The name is derived from an emblem of the Sackvilles of Knole, which is a leopard. We will be learning  a lot about the Sackvilles, a very prominent family in Kent. This is the pub I had picked to stop in for lunch after touring the village. It was highly recommended by the locals also. We sat in the lovely terrace and had a most agreeable meal. Now on to the next garden in the “burbs” of West Hoathly.

The Cat Inn, West Hoathly, Sussex

The Cat Inn, West Hoathly, Sussex

A Great Ride Awaits at the cat Inn, West Hoathly, Sussex

A Great Ride Awaits at the Cat Inn, West Hoathly, Sussex

P S For a good read about the wives of Henry VIII, I  suggest, Six Wives of Henry VIII by Alison Weir. The author draws on early biographies, letters, memoirs, account books, and diplomatic reports to bring each woman to life.  Very interesting!

Mari's Travels with her Camera

Words and Images from around the World

The Travel Lady In Her Shoes

Travel, Gardens, Food, Photography, Books, Shoes

The Hungry Travellers

Independent travel, food, photography and culture

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

Monkey's Tale

An Adventure Travel Blog

Wet and Dusty Roads

Camino stories & other journeys

photographias

photography and life

Touring My Backyard

Rediscovering Singapore

Photography That Matters

A bruised reed He will not break, and smoking flax He will not quench...

marilyn unmasked

deciphering my diversity

Girl in Niagara

Joyful Stories, Wine and Travel

toortsie.com

Skyn, liggie, skyn!

wRighTing My Life

inSpirations and inSights on my pebbled garden path...

Travel with me

Travel snapshots from Toonsarah

Our Forest Garden

Tips and Tools for Gardening in A Forest Community - The Journey Continues

Help from Heaven

Stories to Inspire, Encourage, and Give Hope

HopsSkipsandJumps

Retired and travelling - it doesn't get better than this!

Sheetalbravon

Quirky thoughts on the ultimate question of life, the universe and popcorn.

From Pyrenees to Pennines

We went to France ..... and then we came back.

%d bloggers like this: