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Posts from the ‘Food’ category

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 21, The Jack-be-Little Pumpkin

 

Jack-be-Little Pumpkins

Jack-be-Little Pumpkins

Jack-be-Little Pumpkins are tiny and fit in the palm of your hand. When kept out of the sun they will last for months and are great for display in fall arrangements. They are also edible and have a nice flavor!

 

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 19, The Kakai Pumpkin

 

The Kakai Pumpkin

The Kakai Pumpkin

The kakai pumpkin is round in shape with a relatively soft rind in shades of dark green to broken, mottled blackish-green stripes on a orangish-yellow background.

This pumpkin is grown for the large dark green, hull-less seeds which are good tasting, both raw and roasted, and make a healthy snack!

 

There is More to a Garden Than Flowers

Bodle Street Green, Hailsham, UK

Bodle Street Green, Hailsham, UK

When I first suggested touring gardens as our plan for a vacation, many of my husband’s friends raised an eyebrow and gave my husband that “poor sod look.” I think he was skeptical that this could be the kind of vacation that he would enjoy too. But, to his surprise, last year he liked it!  So we planned another tour of homes and gardens for this year. I think the big factor for him was; there is more to a garden than flowers………..

This year was no exception. Gardens are like a box of chocolates, “you never know what you’re going to get, until you get there.” Cowbeech House was on the list for our first garden visit on the National Garden Schemes this year. The gardens on the National Garden Scheme are local village gardens, with gardeners, who put their gardens on view, once or twice a year, usually on a Saturday and Sunday, to raise money for charity. The gardeners are available to answer questions and show any particular garden features. There is usually something unique about their gardens and that is why they are selected in the first place.

Cowbeech House, located in Cowbeech Village, was part of the Herstmonceux Parish Trail. On this day we saw quite a few gardens on this trail of tranquil settings.

I always enjoy the time and effort it takes just to find these small villages. They are definitely off the beaten path and many times all the time, we are the only Americans, and the villagers are quite surprised that we come “over the pond” to look at their gardens. 

A tip here is….. always plan where you want to eat because the pubs are open only at certain times to serve food and……. preferably eat before you get to the first garden, because you will stay longer than you anticipate and may miss out on the scheduled times to eat! Also, this way your husband will not be starving and wanting you to get a move on!

So our pub meal was at the White Horse Inn, a rural free house on Bodie Street Green in Hailsham. We both had the Sunday Roast and I was so busy talking to the couple next to us about Brexit, that I didn’t get a picture of the delicious meal!

The White Horse Pub, Hailsham, UK

The White Horse Pub, Hailsham, UK

Which way to Go?

Which way to Go?

After our meal we moved on to Cowbeech House and paid our 5 pounds which would allow us entry into five gardens on the trail that day. Needless to say, we did not make it to all of them, but we loved the gardens we did see.

The first part of the garden tour at Cowbeech House was the garage, full of antique cars! Not any cars mind you, these Cars! The house sign was a give away to what was in store for us!

Cowbeech House, Herstmonceux Parish Trail

Cowbeech House, Herstmonceux Parish Trail

This is Mr Cowbeech, not his real name of course, but these lovely cars, garden and house belonged to him and he was quite proud of them! As he should be!

Mr Cowbeech at Cowbeech House

Mr Cowbeech at Cowbeech House

Three Rolls Royces!

Three Rolls Royces!

Rolls Royce

Rolls Royce

Aston Martin, James Bond "Goldfinger"

Aston Martin, James Bond “Goldfinger”

1924 Bentley

1924 Bentley

1924 Bentley

1924 Bentley

1931 Austin Martin International

1931 Auston Martin International

As you can see there was much interest in the garage before we ever got to the garden…… and not everything in the garden is flowers! See you tomorrow to show you the grounds of Cowbeech House!

October: A Month For Pumpkins; Day 12, Pumpkins in a Row

Pumpkins, Quebec City, Canada

Pumpkins, Quebec City, Canada

This is certainly getting your pumpkins in a row!

JNW’s Halloween Challenge: Pumpkin

You Can't Carve Kale!

You Can’t Carve Kale!

I Love these little signs from #PumpkinCan! What can cut fat and cholesterol and add fiber? Pumpkin Can!!! Look eggs in the face and say “not in my recipe!” Won’t you check out Verybestbaking.com?

Have a spooktacular time with JNW’s Halloween Challenge! Enjoy!

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 7, The Pumpkin Label

Vintage Pumpkin Label

Vintage Pumpkin Label from Olney and Floyd Canning Factory

Delta Canning Factory, Oneida NY

Delta Canning Factory, Oneida NY

Many bloggers have asked me recently what the big deal is with pumpkins in the US. This may explain the beginnings on a large scale!

The history of Olney and Floyd Canning Factory in Delta, NY goes like this……..

In 1884, George B. Olney and C. Frank Floyd purchased three or four acres of land by the Mohawk River. It was the first canning factory to be built in this area. The buildings were two stories high and spread out. North of the buildings were long sheds where horse-drawn lumber wagons loaded with sweet corn were placed. On the west and south side of the large building were the store rooms, where the canned goods were stored. The corn was raised by the local farmers. In the fall the corn was cut by hand, shucked by hand, packed into the cans and labled by hand. It was then packed into wooden boxes, and loaded on large wagons pulled by a stout team of horses.

Canners in those days spent their winters making their own cans. On November 20, 1881, a local newspaper stated “Olney and Floyd canning factory owners have purchased a boat load of Welch tin and are preparing to make cans for the next season.”

The Olney and Floyd Company canned corn as the only product at first. Then four years later the Delta plant was purchased. By 1886, both canning factories together had reached the total of one million cans a year. The work at the plant included snipping of beans, shelling peas, shucking corn, all done by hand. Then there was the slow process of filling and hand soldering the tin containers. Can you imagine processing one million cans a year by hand?

In 1881 about 30 people were employed at the can producing factory. In 1887 they were making 4,000 cans a day. It would need to make 600,000 cans to supply both factories. At that time both factories were canning corn, succotash, green and yellow beans, peas, pumpkin, squash, tomatoes, spinach, red kidney beans, lima beans and beets. The Rome Sentinel stated on September 27, 1891, “Olney and Floyd had put up 400,000 cans of corn at the Delta plant. The Westernville factory did the same number that year.”

In 1894 there were 100 people employed in the Delta factory.  With George Jr., John and W. Floyd Olney at the Lee Centre factory, they employed over 200 people at the peak of their business. The Lee Centre plant sold canned goods to many of the local grocery stores such as Loblaws and A. & P.

Around the turn of the century, more produce was canned in Oneida County than any other county in New York. Produce was grown by area farmers. Lee Center Canning Factory was built to replace the Delta factory that had closed it’s doors in 1907, to make way for the Delta Dam project. The Lee Center Canning Factory closed in 1971.

The final verdict: Pumpkin fed people and provided jobs! We still love our pumpkin today!

JNW’s Halloween Challenge: Candy

Witch Fingers

Witch Fingers

Witch Fingers

28 blanched almonds

Black gel food coloring

14 large pretzel rods

12 oz bright green candy coating (I use Wilton’s Vibrant Green Candy Melts. I buy them on Amazon along with everything else, ha ha!)

Prep time: 15 minutes

Yield 28 Witch Fingers

Directions:

1. Paint each almond with black food coloring gel. Set aside to dry.

2. Break or cut each pretzel in half. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

3. Place the green candy coating in microwave and melt in 30 second increments, stirring after every 30 seconds. Heat until candy is completely melted.

4. Dip the pretzel in the green coating leaving 1/2 inch section un-dipped.

5. Place dipped pretzel on baking sheet and place a black almond on the tip for “fingernail.”

6. When the coating is almost dry, but not set, take a toothpick and gently roll across the top and about half way down the finger to add wrinkles.

7. Refrige for 10 minutes to set the coating completely. Serve immediately or place in air tight container for up to one month

PS if you don’t want to use black food coloring at all, you can use regular almonds or chocolate-dipped almonds instead.

Have a spooktacular time with JNW’s Halloween Challenge! Enjoy!

 

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 6, Pumpkin Beer

 

Pumpkin Beer

Pumpkin Beer

The Pilgrims were also known to make pumpkin beer. They fermented a combination of persimmons, hops, maple sugar and pumpkin to make this early colonial brew.

Pumpkin Ale is one of the oldest styles to originate in America.  When New England colonists lacked some beer ingredients they turned to what they could find or grow themselves.  In place of malt they used other fermentable sugars like molasses, sweet potato, or pumpkin.  Alas, pumpkin beers weren’t too popular since the pumpkin was used for its sugar alone rather than its flavor.  Today, pumpkins, along with other pumpkin pie spices, are used in addition to malt to create these fall favorites.

For the Best US Pumpkin Beers Look Here

And I Love the Labels on these beers: Good Gourd, Pumpkick, Fat Jack, Jacques All Lantern and Roadsmary’s Baby !

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 5, Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

My Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

1/2 cup cream

1/2 cup milk

1/4 cup pumpkin puree

1 tbsp maple syrup

1/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice (See recipe HERE)

Combine ingredients in jar and shake well.

Pour into coffee as desired.

Store in fridge for up to 4 days.

Love it!

October: A Month of Pumpkins, Day 4, Pumpkin Pie Spice

Pumpkin Pie Spice

Pumpkin Pie Spice

Sprinkle Pumpkin Pie Spice over whipped cream in a coffee drink!

Make the Pumpkin Pie Spice early in the month! We are going to use it in many recipes to come!

4 tbsp cinnamon

8 tsp ginger

2 tsp allspice

2 tsp nutmeg

2 tsp cloves

Combine all ingredients in a jar and shake well.

Use within 6 months!

I absolutely LOVE it!

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