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Posts from the ‘Gardens’ category

The Montana Garden on the National Garden Scheme

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

People often ask me how I find the open gardens that I visit on the National Garden Scheme in the UK. There is a yearly book, Gardens To Visit on the National Garden Scheme, that I send for, that lists the gardens, the date they will be open and a small description of the garden with directions to get there. Then I look to see what gardens are in the vicinity to my lodgings on the dates that I will be there. Most gardens are open on Saturday and Sundays. There has always been more than one garden to see on the Saturdays and Sundays I was available. I LOVE the Group Openings! These are several gardens, in very close proximity that are featured together. Sometimes you may see seven or more gardens in a day depending on how much time you spend in each garden.

In the previous post I wrote about Cowbeech House, which was part of the Herstmonceux Parish Trail that featured four gardens. All gardens are well marked with several bright yellow balloons and a bright yellow sign as well. Most of the time you can tell you are close to a garden because of the number of cars parked in the lane. On this particular tour there were also balloons and signs posted at different turns on the narrow roads, because some of them looked more like farm lanes and could easily be missed, or as I often say, “are you sure we are on the right road, we are in the middle of nowhere!” But, the middle of nowhere has some very beautiful gardens!

After we left Cowbeech House we were yellow-balloon directed to a cottage called “Montana.” “Montana” wasn’t in my guide book as a garden on the Herstmonceux Parish Trail list of gardens. So here is the explanation why.

The gardeners at “Montana” travel a lot. For the National Garden Scheme, one must commit at least a year in advance to open their garden on a certain date. “Montana” had never opened their garden because they couldn’t commit so far in advance. This seemed like a real shame to one of their neighbors, because she felt their garden was a must-see. So when it came time for the garden tour and she realized the “Montana” gardeners would be home and available, she moved the sign from her garden to theirs!

So we are visiting “Montana” today and it is a first timer!  Aren’t we lucky! Enjoy the garden!

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

These gardeners drew your eye up with many features hidden in trees and hanging on forlorn branches!

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

The Montana Garden

No garden is complete without a retreat! This garden was very deep and wide with many different gardens within the garden! There was so much to see at “Montana” I’ll show you more tomorrow!

 

 

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, East Sussex, UK

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Entry to Cowbeech Estate, Hailsham, UK

The Entry to Cowbeech Estate, Hailsham, UK

The Patio Garden at the Hailsham Estate, UK

The Patio Garden at the Hailsham Estate, UK

Where There is a Him There is a Her, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Where There is a Him There is a Her, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

I love surprises don’t you? That is why I so look forward to the gardens on the National Garden Scheme in the UK! They are all so unique! The gardeners really shine at bringing out the best of their gardens and also their personal tastes and likes. Cowbeech House had many surprises! First of all, there was the car collection! Wow! And then we saw the sculpture collection in the garden that surrounded this beautiful country estate! Mr Cowbeech loved modern art also. So let’s take a walk in this great estate garden!

The Patio Garden at the Hailsham Estate, UK

The Patio Garden at the Hailsham Estate, UK

The Patio Garden at the Hailsham Estate, UK

The Patio Garden at the Hailsham Estate, UK

This is the butterfly garden guarded by the lions!

Art in the Garden, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Art in the Garden, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Patio Garden at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Patio Garden at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Mr Cowbeech also liked cannons!

The Cannon Gazebo, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Cannon Gazebo, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Lawn at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Lawn at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Vegetable Patch, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Vegetable Patch, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Pond at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

The Pond at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

And a Very Big Mosquito, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

And a Very Big Mosquito, Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Well this piece reminded me of a mosquito! But, I liked this little guy tucked into the bushes!

Sculpture at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Sculpture at Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

Cowbeech House, Hailsham, UK

It’s clear to see Mr Cowbeech is a man of the world! As we say goodbye to Cowbeech House and move on to another garden I had to know, “what is a cowbeech?”

The name Cowbeech was first recorded in 1261 as Coppetebeche, referring to a ‘capped’ or pollarded Beech tree. This was then shortened over the years to Coppebeche, Cobbeach and then to the Cobeech, before becoming the modern Cowbeech. Ahh, that explains it!

See you tomorrow in the garden!

 

There is More to a Garden Than Flowers

Bodle Street Green, Hailsham, UK

Bodle Street Green, Hailsham, UK

When I first suggested touring gardens as our plan for a vacation, many of my husband’s friends raised an eyebrow and gave my husband that “poor sod look.” I think he was skeptical that this could be the kind of vacation that he would enjoy too. But, to his surprise, last year he liked it!  So we planned another tour of homes and gardens for this year. I think the big factor for him was; there is more to a garden than flowers………..

This year was no exception. Gardens are like a box of chocolates, “you never know what you’re going to get, until you get there.” Cowbeech House was on the list for our first garden visit on the National Garden Schemes this year. The gardens on the National Garden Scheme are local village gardens, with gardeners, who put their gardens on view, once or twice a year, usually on a Saturday and Sunday, to raise money for charity. The gardeners are available to answer questions and show any particular garden features. There is usually something unique about their gardens and that is why they are selected in the first place.

Cowbeech House, located in Cowbeech Village, was part of the Herstmonceux Parish Trail. On this day we saw quite a few gardens on this trail of tranquil settings.

I always enjoy the time and effort it takes just to find these small villages. They are definitely off the beaten path and many times all the time, we are the only Americans, and the villagers are quite surprised that we come “over the pond” to look at their gardens. 

A tip here is….. always plan where you want to eat because the pubs are open only at certain times to serve food and……. preferably eat before you get to the first garden, because you will stay longer than you anticipate and may miss out on the scheduled times to eat! Also, this way your husband will not be starving and wanting you to get a move on!

So our pub meal was at the White Horse Inn, a rural free house on Bodie Street Green in Hailsham. We both had the Sunday Roast and I was so busy talking to the couple next to us about Brexit, that I didn’t get a picture of the delicious meal!

The White Horse Pub, Hailsham, UK

The White Horse Pub, Hailsham, UK

Which way to Go?

Which way to Go?

After our meal we moved on to Cowbeech House and paid our 5 pounds which would allow us entry into five gardens on the trail that day. Needless to say, we did not make it to all of them, but we loved the gardens we did see.

The first part of the garden tour at Cowbeech House was the garage, full of antique cars! Not any cars mind you, these Cars! The house sign was a give away to what was in store for us!

Cowbeech House, Herstmonceux Parish Trail

Cowbeech House, Herstmonceux Parish Trail

This is Mr Cowbeech, not his real name of course, but these lovely cars, garden and house belonged to him and he was quite proud of them! As he should be!

Mr Cowbeech at Cowbeech House

Mr Cowbeech at Cowbeech House

Three Rolls Royces!

Three Rolls Royces!

Rolls Royce

Rolls Royce

Aston Martin, James Bond "Goldfinger"

Aston Martin, James Bond “Goldfinger”

1924 Bentley

1924 Bentley

1924 Bentley

1924 Bentley

1931 Austin Martin International

1931 Auston Martin International

As you can see there was much interest in the garage before we ever got to the garden…… and not everything in the garden is flowers! See you tomorrow to show you the grounds of Cowbeech House!

Art In the Potting Shed Garden, Benenden, UK, Post Four

 

A Garden Gate at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Garden Gate at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Well let’s go through this extraordinary garden at the Potting Shed once last time! First go through another garden gate. Charlotte has made gates into  an art form, that’s for sure!

Another Outdoor Eating Area at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Another Outdoor Eating Area at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

And Through Another Gate, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

And Through Another Gate, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Into the Vegetable Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Into the Vegetable Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

hroughout the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Art Throughout the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

hroughout the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Art Throughout the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Look up, look down, we don’t want to miss a thing! And then into the Cutting Flower Garden!

Into the Vegetable Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Into the Cutting Flower Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Through the arbor!

 Through the Arbor, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Through the Arbor, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

We must stop by and see the turtles!

The Turtles Pen, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Turtle Pen, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

And the turtles up close!

The Turtles

The Turtles

Through another gate!

Through Another Gate at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Through Another Gate at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Onward to the bee keeps.

 The Bee Keeps at The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Bee Keeps at The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

And then to the Artist’s Retreat!

An Artist's Retreat, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

An Artist’s Retreat, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Through another gate!

The Last Gate, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Last Gate, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

To the last Retreat!

Another Artist's Retreat,The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Another Artist’s Retreat,The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Don’t throw away anything! Charlotte has re-cycled everything in her garden from thrown away treasures! See what you can do with them? Old gates, old doors, old odd windows here and there! Save the fallen branches too!

The Artist's Retreat,The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Artist’s Retreat,The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

You can see what an unusual gardening experience this is! It was an absolutely charming and very restful garden and lodging to come back to at the end of a touring day!

Don and Charlotte at the Potting Shed, can be reached Here.

PS…. I took photos of Don and Charlotte, and you can see why this garden is so magical, just by the look of them! But…….. they requested their photos not be published on the blog…….so I am honoring their request!

Tomorrow we’ll be touring a garden on the National Garden Scheme!  See you there!

A Walk in the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK: Post Three

Through Another Garden Gate, the Potting Shed

Through Another Garden Gate, the Potting Shed

The Gardens at the Potting Shed, Bebenden, UK

The Gardens at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Today we are exploring the property of the Potting Shed, a good five acres to get us up and about! Don and Charlotte are the proud owners of this beautiful property and lovingly take care of it. As I mentioned yesterday, Don was a farmer, and then the head gardener to Collingwood “Cherry” Ingram on his estate called ‘The Grange’ in Benenden. When Ingram died in 1981, ‘the Grange’ was divided and sold in parcels. This is where the story gets very interesting……… you just never know what you are going to stumble upon when looking into gardens! Don bought a parcel of five acres of ‘the Grange’ that also had the original gardener’s cottage on it and that is where he and Charlotte lived. What a keeper! And that original cottage, where they still live, is very much as it was when it was built in the 1930’s. Tiny, small rooms with huge fireplaces, slate floors and an old fashioned kitchen with a stove that was built before the AGA, I envied! I wanted to take pictures so badly, but how do you say, “Wow I might never see another cottage like this again and I know this is your private abode, but can I take about 500 pictures?” So I kept my mouth shut and just oggled and awed.

Now at the time I knew nothing about Cherry Ingram, so I had to find out more about him, so Don and Charlotte explained.

Collingwood “Cherry” Ingram (30 October 1880–19 May 1981) was an ornithologist, plant collector and gardener, who was an authority on Japanese flowering cherries.

In the early 1900s, Sir William Ingram employed Wilfred Stalker to collect bird skins in Australia for Collingwood to identify and catalogue at the London Natural History Museum, resulting in his first major publication. In 1907 he collected in Japan and for his work there he was made an Honorary Member of the Ornithological Society of Japan. However, his main interest was in the field study of birds; he made the first record of marsh warblers breeding in Kent. He was an accomplished bird artist. A planned book on the birds of France was interrupted by World War I and never completed, although part emerged as Birds of the Riviera in 1926. His 1916–18 journals record his war experiences and also his off-duty bird observations and sketches behind the lines in northern France. His published war diaries are packed with his pencil sketches of birds, people and landscapes. He interrogated pilots, on the height at which birds fly, resulting in a short paper after the War. He was member of the British Ornithologists’ Union for a record 81 years!

The Birdhouses, the Potting Shed

The Birdhouses, the Potting Shed

After World War I, horticulture took over from ornithology as Collingwood Ingram’s dominant interest. He created his famous garden at ‘The Grange’ in Benenden and collected plants across the world. His outstanding plant-collecting trips were to Japan in 1926 and South Africa in 1927.

By 1926, he was a world authority on Japanese cherries and was asked to address the Cherry Society in Japan on their national tree. It was on this visit that he was shown a painting of a beautiful white cherry, then thought to be extinct in Japan. He recognized it as one he had seen in a very bad state in a Sussex garden, the result of an early introduction from Japan. He had taken cuttings and so was able to re-introduce it to the gardening world as ‘Tai Haku’, the name meaning ‘Great White Cherry’. In March 2016 a book on his contribution to the survival of Japanese cherries was published in Japan: the title Cherry Ingram: the English Saviour of Japan’s Cherry Blossoms. He introduced many Japanese and species cherries to the country, as well as a number of his own hybrids. His 1948 book, Ornamental Cherries, became a standard work. Ingram introduced many other new garden plants, the best known of which are probably ‘Rubus Benenden’  a vigorous, medium sized deciduous shrub. Its white flowers have a yellow stamen at it’s center, and five saucer shaped petals. Its fruit are similar to those of the Bramble. The Rosemary, ‘Benenden Blue’ was also his work. Oh wow!

So now we will walk around the property and see what Don and Charlotte have added to it, besides the wonderful Potting Shed! Remember they are both artists, as well, and have added many cottages for their craft.

The Cactus Cottage

The Cactus Cottage

The Cactus and Succulants

The Cactus and Succulents

The Weaving Room

The Weaving Room

Inside the Weaving Room

Inside the Weaving Room

The Artist's Studio at the Potting Shed

The Artist’s Studio at the Potting Shed Property

The Artist's Studio at the Potting Shed

The Artist’s Studio at the Potting Shed Property

The Artist's Studio at the Potting Shed

The Artist’s Studio at the Potting Shed Property

The Chickens at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Chickens at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

A Walk Through the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Don and Charlotte at the Potting Shed can be reached Here. I am writing many posts on the Potting Shed so be sure to check them all out! Tomorrow we’ll learn more about this fabulous garden!  Until then ……..Enjoy!

The Potting Shed, Benenden, Kent, UK, Post Two

One of the Gardens at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

One of the Gardens at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

As some of you know this is my second year for my England Garden Tour, where I pick out spots in the UK to spend a few weeks and then visit lovely gardens, including local gardens sponsored on the National Garden Theme and homes and gardens on the National Trust. I had a little rough start to my visit to St Ives, but as most things do in the end, it turned out even better than I expected. Now, we have made our way to The Potting Shed in Benenden, which I have been anxiously waiting for. This time we would also be staying/living in a garden too. What would it be like?

I booked The Potting Shed over a year ago to make sure I could get accommadations to stay there at the time I wanted. My better half always asks me, “where do you find these places?” Well, I do a lot of homework looking for unusual spots for lodging and I like things off the beaten track and things not typical of what everybody is doing.

The Potting Shed fit the bill. It truly is a Potting Shed in the yard of two very prolific gardeners! I would say Charlotte, one of the gardeners, is a cross between Beatrice Potter and Tasha Tudor! Don was originally a farmer and has spent a lifetime gardening ( more on that in another post) But, between the two, they truly live off the land, thrive in it and a motto for them might be “waste not, want not.” Invited into their cottage for wine one evening, we got a look at how one lived in the early 1900’s, the period their cottage was made, and I can’t say many updates have been made to ruin it! I couldn’t take my eyes off the magical wonder of their lifestyle and how it would truly be living like that. No modern Ikea stuff here! Charlotte is also an artist and painter, everything she touches is made beautiful, so they enjoy scouting the countryside for finds and then bring them home to enhance their gardens! While we were there they were looking for more old doors!

The Potting Shed, on the other hand, was meant to be quite modern in comfort and cozy. The appliances are up to date and there is Wi-fi and a TV. The furniture has been re-designed in fabrics and style with Charlotte’s eye for the bohemian flair, nothing fancy, but very stylish. So without further ado, let’s look at the inside of the Potting Shed!

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

 The Potting Shed, Benenden, Kent, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

These stairs are called Paddle Steps. I had never heard of them, but they are great for saving space in small spaces!

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The bedroom was in the loft! Loved it!

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

One of the Many Bouquets in the Potting Shed, UK

One of the Many Bouquets in the Potting Shed, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The kitchen had everything you need, even a dishwasher!

The Gift Basket at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Gift Basket at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Charlotte and Don also left a very generous welcome basket of local wine, cheeses, chutney and crackers. There was also fresh picked salad greens from the garden and eggs from their chickens!

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

More Flowers from the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

More Flowers from the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Out into the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Out into the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Charlotte made all the topiaries and trims them herself on a very tall ladder! Oh MY! Well there are some that are quite near the ground too!

Out into the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Out into the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

She has left their footprints in the garden, so to speak!

In the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

In the Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

There are over five acres of gardens and other delights at the Potting Shed! Both Charlotte and Don are very savvy gardeners and have a list and knowledge of other gardens in the area. So many in fact, that I was not aware of, that I added them to my “must see” list. So tomorrow we will be taking a stroll through other parts of their garden and I am sure you will not want to miss it! Let’s go through this gate and see what is in this garden!

The Next Gate, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Next Gate, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

We have stayed many places in the twenty years of our travels, but have never been received or taken care of so well as we were at our stay at the Potting Shed. If you love gardens and gardening and would like to experience a “once in a lifetime” find, this is the spot for you! Don and Charlotte at the Potting Shed can be reached Here. I am writing many posts on the Potting Shed so be sure to check them all out! Enjoy!

The Garden That Fairy-Tales are Made Of; Post One

St George Church, Benenden, UK

St George Church, Benenden, UK

This is the story about a beautiful garden, where the birds sang so sweetly, and a fairy cottage filled with vases of fresh picked bouquets from the garden. But, first we have to find this garden…….. take a narrow road to the Weald of Kent….. turn into the horseshoe lane around the cricket pitch set on the village green…..……

The Cricket Pitch, Benenden, UK

The Cricket Pitch, Benenden, UK

Turn right at St George Church with the lichen-covered wall, onto a much smaller lane……..

St George Church, Benenden, UK

St George Church, Benenden, UK

The Lane, Benenden, UK

The Lane, Benenden, UK

Go past the public walking path, down the graveled lane and turn into the gate.

Public Foot Path, Benenden, UK

Public Foot Path, Benenden, UK

The Smaller Lane. Benenden,UK

The Smaller Lane. Benenden, UK

Follow that lane unto you come to the gardeners’ house and then follow the path into the garden of the Potting Shed.  Then follow the path through the arbor……….. are you still following me?

The Path to the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Path to the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Turn to the right and follow the path through another garden gate……….

The Path to the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Path to the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

You have discovered paradise! The Potting Shed!

The Garden Shed, Benenten, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Outside the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Outside the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK 

The Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

One of the Many Gardens at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The Front Garden at the Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Step outside the cottage and follow the gravel paths. There were the vegetable gardens, and the flower gardens, intermingled with sculptures of all sizes and textures, and finely scissored topiary gardens. So much to see!

The Sculpture in the Garden

The Sculpture in the Garden, Everything Has a Use

The Sculpture in the Garden

The Sculpture in the Garden, the Potting Shed

Walking Through the Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

Walking Through to Another Garden, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The First Vegetable Patch, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

The First Vegetable Patch, The Potting Shed, Benenden, UK

There was a private spot in the garden with a table and chairs where one could remanence about the day over a bottle of wine, and watch the sun sink below the clouds. Or you could follow path, after path, going deeper into the gardens.

The Outdoor Dining, The Garden Shed, Benenden, UK

The Outdoor Dining, The Garden Shed, Benenden, UK

The Topiary Garden, Benenden, UK

One of the Topiary Gardens, Benenden, UK

I LOVED the little round balls cut into the hedge of massive boxwood! And what about these giant topiary birds!

The Topiary Garden, Benenden, UK

Turn the key! I can’t wait to go inside!

Turn the Key, The Potting Shed

Turn the Key, The Potting Shed

The flowers picked from the garden are waiting to greet us! Tomorrow there will be posts from inside the Potting Shed and details on how to make reservations to stay there! See you in the garden! Just the first of many gardens on my Second English Garden Tour!

One Bunch of Welcome Flowers

One Bunch of Welcome Flowers

Don and Charlotte at the Potting Shed in Benenden, Kent, can be reached Here. I am writing many posts on the Potting Shed so be sure to check them all out! Enjoy!

Reason to Love St Ives # 7: Sculpture and Barbara Hepworth Garden

The Walkway Above the Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Walkway Above the Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Entire Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

The Entire Gate at Trewyn House, St Ives

Trewyn House, St Ives

Trewyn House, St Ives

During the Secret Garden Tour there was a lovely garden space that was the largest piece of turf that we saw in St Ives, that was devoted to a garden. The garden had a locked gate, and I got the feeling it was opened only on special occasions, hence for the Secret Garden Tour. Across from the garden a small lane divided the garden from one of the most unusual gates that I have ever seen. Behind that beautiful gate is the Barbara Hepworth Sculpture Garden or also known as Trewyn House.

Dame Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth DBE was an English artist and sculptor. Her work exemplifies Modernism and in particular modern sculpture. She was one of the few female artists to achieve international prominence.  Hepworth was a leading figure in the colony of artists who resided in St Ives during the Second World War.

Barbara Hepworth first came to live in Cornwall with her husband Ben Nicholson and their young family at the outbreak of war in 1939. She lived and worked in Trewyn studios – now the Barbara Hepworth Museum – from 1949 until her death in 1975, from a fire in the studio. Following her wish to establish her home and studio as a museum of her work, Trewyn Studio and much of the artist’s work remaining there was given to the nation and placed in the care of the Tate Gallery in 1980.

‘Finding Trewyn Studio was a sort of magic’, wrote Barbara Hepworth. ‘Here was a studio, a yard and garden where I could work in open air and space.’ When she first arrived at Trewyn Studio, Hepworth was still largely preoccupied with stone and wood carving, but during the 1950s she increasingly made sculpture in bronze as well. This led her to create works on a more monumental scale, for which she used the garden as a viewing area.

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

The Garden of Trewyn House, St Ives

Most of the bronzes are in the positions in which the artist herself placed them. The garden itself was laid out by Barbara Hepworth with help from a friend, the composer, Priaulx Rainier.

"Figure for Landscape" 1959-60 Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

“Figure for Landscape” 1959-60, Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

Garden Sculpture (Model for Meridian) 1958 Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

Garden Sculpture (Model for Meridian)1958, Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

"Conversation with Magic Stones" 1973 Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975 Accepted by HM Government in lieu of tax and allocated to the Tate Museum

“Conversation with Magic Stones” 1973, Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975

Her eldest son, Paul, was killed on February 13, 1953 in a plane crash while serving with the Royal Air Force in Thailand. A memorial to him, Madonna and Child, is in the parish Church of St Ives.

Exhausted in part from her son’s death, Hepworth travelled to Greece with her good friend Margaret Gardiner in August 1954.

When Hepworth returned to St Ives from Greece, she found that Gardiner had sent her a large shipment of Nigerian guarea hardwood. Although she received only a single tree trunk, Hepworth noted that the shipment from Nigeria to the Tilbury docks came in at 17 tons. Between 1954-1956 Hepworth sculpted six pieces out of this guarea wood!

It was proposed at one time to take up the garden and use the land to build council housing! I for one am glad they didn’t, it is a calming oasis is a sea of tourists.

HEPWORTH Barbara, 1966, sculpteur (GB) © ERLING MANDELMANN ©

HEPWORTH Barbara, 1966, sculpteur (GB)
© ERLING MANDELMANN ©

 

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 6, Pumpkin Beer

 

Pumpkin Beer

Pumpkin Beer

The Pilgrims were also known to make pumpkin beer. They fermented a combination of persimmons, hops, maple sugar and pumpkin to make this early colonial brew.

Pumpkin Ale is one of the oldest styles to originate in America.  When New England colonists lacked some beer ingredients they turned to what they could find or grow themselves.  In place of malt they used other fermentable sugars like molasses, sweet potato, or pumpkin.  Alas, pumpkin beers weren’t too popular since the pumpkin was used for its sugar alone rather than its flavor.  Today, pumpkins, along with other pumpkin pie spices, are used in addition to malt to create these fall favorites.

For the Best US Pumpkin Beers Look Here

And I Love the Labels on these beers: Good Gourd, Pumpkick, Fat Jack, Jacques All Lantern and Roadsmary’s Baby !

October: A Month of Pumpkins; Day 5, Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

My Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

1/2 cup cream

1/2 cup milk

1/4 cup pumpkin puree

1 tbsp maple syrup

1/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice (See recipe HERE)

Combine ingredients in jar and shake well.

Pour into coffee as desired.

Store in fridge for up to 4 days.

Love it!

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