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Posts tagged ‘Thursday Doors’

Thursday Doors at Tintinhull

Tintinhull, A National Trust Property in Somerset, UK

Tintinhull, A National Trust Property in Somerset, UK

Main Entrance at Tintinhull

Main Entrance at Tintinhull

The Boxwood Entrance at Tintinhull

The Boxwood Entrance at Tintinhull, Notice the Diamond Shaped Stone Walkway

Tintinhull, a National Trust property in Somerset, was our second stop of the day on our way to Cornwall.

Keep in mind that finding a particular National Trust property makes some of the best adventures! They are usually off the beaten path and although are addressed in small villages many times I never find the small village!

Tintinhull, is a small, tidy property that just fits the bill. By 1630 the Napper family had constructed the east side of the present house, and this was extended by Andrew Napper in 1722 when the classical west facade and forecourt were built. In about 1900 Tintinhull was sold to Dr S J M Price. He developed the west forecourt as a garden, laying the distinctive diamond-patterned flagged walk and planting the flanking clipped domes of boxwood. Notice the big eagles on the wall too! In 1933 Tintinhull was sold to Captain and Mrs P.E. Reiss, who developed garden enclosures linked by carefully designed vistas and rich planting. Phyllis Emily Reiss created a garden around the 17th century manor house, with six compartments, each room having it’s own character and identity, divided by clipped hedges and walls. She designed the Pool Garden as a memorial to a nephew killed in WWII. The house, gardens and woodland walk create all the charm at Tintinhull!

In July 1939 Reiss made two broadcasts for the BBC entitled ‘In my Garden.’ In 1959 she gave Tintinhull to the National Trust although she lived there until her death on the 18th September 1961.   

Penelope Hobhouse and her husband, Professor John Malins lived at Tintinhull for fourteen years and was in charge of the gardens there from 1980 until 1993. With a name like Penelope Hobhouse, (my auto spelling corrector wants to name her Penelope Hothouse) it’s a given that she was a garden writer, garden historian, self taught gardener and lecturer. She went on to design many gardens in England, Scotland, France, Italy, Spain, Germany and the United States. I especially like her name and I think it is perfect for a gardener! She has written several garden books, and Penelope Hobhouse on Gardening, written in 1994, describes her gardening experiences at Tintinhull.  You can find a video of her Here.

Now let’s take a look at Tintinhull!

The Garden Map at Tintinhull

The Garden Map at Tintinhull

Birds on the Wall Is Always Good!

Birds on the Wall Is Always Good!

Another Entrance to Tintinhull

Another Entrance to Tintinhull

A Very Small Door at Tintinhull

A Very Small Door at Tintinhull

How about this very small door! Was it an opening to a guard shack? Did you drop off the mail here? What was it used for?

A Few Doors to be Seen Here!

A Few Doors to be Seen Here!

i LOVE the Color of the Stone Too!

I LOVE the Color of the Stone Too!

Penelope Hobhouse was noted for her Terra Cotta planters! And I don’t want to miss the windows either!

Somme Window Treatment at Tintinhull

Some Window Treatment at Tintinhull

Another Door and Some More Pots!

Another Door, More Windows and Some More Pots!

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

Only two rooms are open for viewing at Tintinhull. Short, sweet, and modest!

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull, with Very Deep Doorways!

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

Inside Tintinhull

The Barn Tea Room Entrance Doors at Tintinhull

The Barn Tea Room Entrance Doors at Tintinhull

Inside the Tearoom at Tintinhull

Inside the Tearoom at Tintinhull

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhul

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

 

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhul

A Few Garden Photos at Tintinhull

Did you find the doorways in the garden?

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

This section of Row Houses must refer to the village at Tintinhull! This is the only “village” I saw! Loved their cottage gardens and what else? More Red Doors!

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

Row Houses at Tintinhull

 

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

Thursday’s Doors, Stourhead

The Gate Keepers Cottage, Stourhead

The Gate Keepers Cottage, Stourhead

Today’s Doors come from the gardens at Stourhead, a National Trust estate in Devon, UK. This summer as part of my “English Garden Tour” I again explored many fine estates and gardens, both public and private, as I toured along my path to Cornwall and then back to Sussex and Kent.

These are photos of the fabulous doors I found at Stourhead! If you would like to know more about the estate look HERE in the previous post about it!

When you arrive at Stourhead, you pass the gate keepers cottage. I loved the door, and the look of the cottage was just my style.

I can’t imagine living in the estate house with all those pictures to dust and all those rooms to clean. Of course, the owners of Stourhead didn’t have to do any of that either! They had plenty of servants, housemaids, butlers, farm workers, gardeners, and ground keepers to maintain their 2600 acre estate. But, I am glad the National Trust preserves not only the manor house, but all the out buildings as well. It gives you a proper prospective of things, although I imagine the estate cottages and out buildings are nicer today than they were back in the day!

Stourhead, of course, has the estate house and this was the door that welcomed you in! There are lots of rooms to tour here and a very interesting family history.

The Main Entry Door at Stourhead

The Main Entry Door at Stourhead Manor House

Stourhead

The Manor House at Stourhead, (Notice the Main Entrance and the Servants Entrance!)

Then there are the out buildings and these doors were some of my favorites!

The Limey Green Door at Stourhead

The Mossy Green Door at Stourhead

A Close Up of the Limey Green Door, Stourhead

A Close Up of the Mossy Green Door, Stourhead

I love that stonework too and the door defines the mossiness of it!

A Thursday Window That I Liked Too, Ha Ha

A Thursday Window That I Liked Too, Ha Ha

Another Outbuilding with Limey Green Door and Fantastic Windows

Another Outbuilding with Mossy Green Door and Fantastic Windows

Workers Cottages at Stourhead

Workers Cottages at Stourhead

Workers Cottages at Stourhead

Workers Cottages at Stourhead

The Workers Cottages at Stourhead

The Row of Workers Cottages at Stourhead

Of course the connected worker’s cottages were my very favorite! And they all had Red Doors!

The Red Cottage Doors!

The Red Cottage Doors!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

Thursday Doors; The Hidden Doors of Italy

 

 Italian Door

New Doors Set into Old Door Opening

 Italian Door

Italian Door Blocked Up

Blocked Up Italian Door

Blocked Up Italian Door

 Italian Door

The Wrought Iron Italian Door Covering

New Very Narrow Italian Door

New Very Narrow Italian Door

Today for Door Day I thought we might look at some more of the fascinating Italian Doors! Sometimes when I am looking for doors I come upon doors that look like there have been different doors in that spot in the past and new doors have taken their place for whatever reason. I always wonder what was the previous door like? Some have an arch where the door would have been and some entrances have been bricked up!

 Italian Door

Italian Church Door Within a Door

Then there are the doors within the door.  I see these quite frequently at churches. The main doors are massive and quite heavy, so there is a little door in the big door, making it easier to pass through. Look for the pull, that is still above your shoulder! The heavy, giant, door usually has a bolt system on the inside. Is it to keep out unwanted guests?

 Italian Door

New Italian Door

And then there is the door that looks like it is in the mouth of a grotto!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

Thursday Doors: The Medici Family

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

Here we are in Italy, this time in Florence, seeing fantastic doors!

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

The Medici Family was an Italian banking family, and political dynasty that produced three Popes of the Catholic Church, and two Queens of France. The family ruled Tuscany from 1513 until 1737. We find their symbols,(balls) first displayed on their crest, then prominently displayed on buildings all over Florence and Tuscany, which were financed by Medici money. Some say the balls represented coins, others say medicinal pills that recalled the family’s origins as doctors or apothecaries. This door represents everything that the Medici family represented: the Popes, the Queens, The Dynasty! Balls, balls, and more balls!

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Ball, Florence, Italy

Here is another interesting door! This one can be found at one of the churches sponsored by the Medici family. Do you know what this door was used for? The poor would knock on the door and receive scraps of food!

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door at the Duomo, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door at the Duomo, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

A Medici Door, Florence, Italy

I hope you have enjoyed our walk through Florence today seeing some of the Medici Doors! If you go to Tuscany be on the lookout for them!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

 

 

Thursday Doors: May 19th, 2016

A Stroll Through Orvieto, Italy

A Stroll Through Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

The Doors of Orvieto, Italy

Orvieto, Italy is a dream come true.  From the train it is hardly noticed as one flies by from Rome to Florence. But getting off the train at Orvieto is well worth it. The location of the city rises above the almost-vertical faces of tuff cliffs that are completed by defensive walls built of the same stone called Tufa. Renting one of the nicest apartments we’ve ever had in Europe we arrived during their biggest festival of the year, Festa del Corpus Domini. Our hostess thought that was the reason we were there. We didn’t know anything about it, and thought how fortunate we were to be there for the festival. This Etruscan town is also noted for it’s woodworking and many doors feature their hand made pieces of art.  One thing you will never forget is the fragrance of jasmine from the vines that sweep across the door entrances or along many of the walls!  Enjoy!

The Swags of Jasmine Over the Doors in Orvieto, Italy

The Swags of Jasmine Over the Doors in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

The Main Shopping Area in Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

I made a video presenting some of the doors of Orvieto and the spectacular surroundings

The Streets of Orvieto, Italy

There is also an underground city underneath Orvieto. Many of the homes of the noble families had a means of escape from the elevated city during times of siege, through secret escape tunnels carved in the soft rock. There was also an underground well dug to supply the town with water.

Underground Orvieto, Italy

Underground Orvieto, Italy

The Duomo or Cathedral of Orvieto, was built on the main square of the town starting in the 12th century for Pope Hadrian IV. It is huge! The side walls are made of horizontal stripes of dark green and white marble! How about that for a door? Look at the size of the people in comparison!

The Duomo in Orvieto, Italy

The Duomo in Orvieto, Italy

Here is the part of town where the people live!

Streets of Orvieto, italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Streets of Orvieto, Italy

Visiting Orvieto is a good way to experience Italy without all the bustle. There are several museums tracing the history of the town, fine eating, shops with well made, hand-made goods, and lovely people! Orvieto is a great place to stop! To find out more about Orvieto check out my other blog posts and videos featuring the Festa del Corpus Domini and things to do in Orvieto!

I hope you enjoyed our walk through Orvieto! This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

 

 

 

 

Thursday Doors: May 12, 2016

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

In Part Two of the Doors of Madison, Georgia, we are looking at the Cottages! Not all the homes here were the mansions on the plantations as we saw last week! But, they are still on many acre lots!

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

Rose Cottage, Madison, Georgia

Adeline Rose built her house in 1891. Little is known of her before October 1891 when she earned her living by taking in washing and ironing at 50 cents a load. Most of her early work was done for the boarders of the Hardy House. Hardy House was owned by the mother of Oliver “Ollie” Hardy (born Norvell Hardy) on January 18, 1892. He was the comic actor famous as one half of the act, Laurel and Hardy! He lived in Madison, as a child.  Adeline Rose died in 1959 after living in the house for 68 years. In 1966, the City of Madison moved the Rose Cottage to its present location. It was felt that it was very important to save this little house built out of the labor of love of a woman who was born into slavery.

 A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

 A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

Notice the tin roofs on the previous cottages?

Thomas Jefferson was an early advocate of tin roofing, and he installed a standing-seam tin roof on “Monticello” (ca. 1770-1802).

However, once rolling mills were established in this country, the low cost, light weight, and low maintenance of tin plate made it the most common roofing material. Embossed tin shingles, whose surfaces created interesting patterns, were popular throughout the country in the late 19th century. Tin roofs were kept well-painted, usually red.

 A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

 A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

Another must on any Southern cottage is a porch! Notice they all had at least one!

 A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

And finally one of the few bright cottages in Madison! Did you notice nearly every home big or small was white?

 A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

A Cottage in Madison, Georgia

I hope you enjoyed our walk through Madison! This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors? See you next week!

Thursday Doors: May 5, 2016

Antebellum Trail, Madison, GA

Antebellum Trail, Madison, GA

Today, for our look at DOORS, we’re visiting Madison, Georgia, population 3,636. The Historic District in Madison is one of the largest in the state with almost 100 antebellum homes (homes built prior to the American Civil War) that to this day are still lovingly cared for and lived in. Most have never been sold, but passed along in the family. Madison is featured on Georgia’s Antebellum Trail (The Antebellum Trail is a 100 mile trek through seven historic communities that escaped Sherman’s burning march through Georgia, during the Civil War)  Madison has been voted “The Prettiest Small Town in America.”

Georgia Antebellum Trail

Location of Georgia Antebellum Trail

Georgia Antebellum Trail

Towns on Georgia Antebellum Trail

First we have to get there! Just follow the country road and go through the covered bridge. There are not too many of these left either!

Covered Bridge near Madison, Georgia

Covered Bridge near Madison, Georgia

Covered Bridge near Madison, Georgia

Covered Bridge near Madison, Georgia

Entering Madison, first there is the business district, so well preserved on a town square.

Madison, Georgia Courthouse and Town Hall

Madison, Georgia County Courthouse and Town Hall

Chamber of Commerce, Madison, Georgia

Chamber of Commerce, Madison, Georgia

The Pink Petit Jardin, Madison, Georgia

The Pink Petit Jardin, Madison, Georgia

The SchoolHouse, Madison, Georgia

The SchoolHouse, Madison, Georgia

In Madison, they make it easy to look at some of the homes, just follow the Wellness Trail!

Wellness Trail, Madison, Georgia

Wellness Trail, Madison, Georgia

No, I didn’t take a photo of every house, but I should have. And I photographed the entire site so you could get an idea of the architecture and size of the dwelling. I don’t have the correct southern drawl to just walk up to the front of the house like I’m a long lost relative! Most of the homes also sit on lovely lots of many acres, that were former plantations.  In 1890, the population was 2,131, and the town boasted of an oil mill, a soap factory, a fertilizer factory, four steam ginneries, two carriage factories, a furniture factory, a grist and flour mill, bottling works, a distillery with a capacity of 120 gallons a day, an ice factory, a canning factory, a bank with a capital of $75,000 and a number of individual businesses! They were very well off I’d say! AND the homes reveal just how wealthy they were!

The Big House, Madison, Georgia

The Big House, Madison, Georgia

The Cottage Next to the Big House, Madison, Georgia

The Cottage Next to the Big House, Madison, Georgia

Madison was founded in 1807 and was named for President James Madison. It was described as “the most cultured and aristocratic town on the stagecoach route from Charleston to New Orleans.” Many believe that General William Tecumseh Sherman spared the town because it was too beautiful to burn down during his March to the Sea, but in truth Madison was home to pro-Union Senator Joshua Hill, who had ties with Sherman’s brother at West Point. It’s not what you know, but who you know, that counted here!

Madison, Georgia

The Pale Blue Home, Madison, Georgia

Madison, Georgia

Madison, Georgia

This one is getting an Up-Do!

Madison, Georgia

Madison, Georgia

 I hope you enjoyed our stroll through town. I am dividing this post into two sections, because there were so many great doors! Next week the Cottages of Madison, those for the regular folk! See you there!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

Thursday Doors: April 28, 2016

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

One of the best places in the world to look at DOORS would be New Orleans, Louisiana. The houses are colorful, quirky, old, and one of a kind and so are their doors! And notice the intricate latticework too!

The “Shotgun House” is very popular here. It is a narrow rectangular residence, usually no more than 12 feet wide, with rooms arranged one behind the other and doors at each end of the house. It is said that a shotgun blast could pass from one end of the house and out the other, un-impeded, hence it’s name! It was the most popular style of house in the Southern United States from the end of the American Civil War through the 1960’s.

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Some of the houses are the “Double Shotgun” style with two front doors.

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Double Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Double Shotgun House with Icicle Trim, New Orleans, Louisiana

Double Shotgun House with Icicle Trim, New Orleans, Louisiana

Space is at a premium here in the Marigny neighborhood. The houses have several common traits; trash cans (sometimes painted a wild color) always sit in the front of the house, as do cars and motorbikes, mostly parked on the tiny sidewalks along with the trash cans. Parking space is a luxury here. Also notice the beads, lights and other trinkets scattered haphazardly everywhere! Color is everywhere, and for the most part the brighter the color and their combinations on the house, the better! It’s always nice to add a plant or two too!

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Shot Gun House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Wrought iron (worked by hand) decoration or fencing is associated with New Orleans too. Previous to the mid-1800’s balconies and porches were made of tall wooden columns. The Spanish influenced the decorative ironwork, mimicked after their lacework, to add visual contrast to dreary fronts. The more ornate work is often floral or leafy, adorned with the French fleur-de-lis and coquilles (shells) associated with saints (Saint James ) or religious pilgrims. Cast iron details are Victorian additions and not original to the townhouses. Some of the houses are fancy!

Fancy House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Fancy House, New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans Style

New Orleans Style

New Orleans Style

New Orleans Style with Color and Plants

New Orleans Style

New Orleans Style

New Orleans Style

New Orleans Style with Black Cat Fence

And there is a combination of everything that brings the businesses to life!

 

The New Orleans Style Business Door

The New Orleans Style Business Door

Just ride your bike so you can drink more!

The New Orleans Style Business Door

The New Orleans Style Business Door

The New Orleans Style Business Door

The New Orleans Style Business Door

The Jazz Club, New Orleans, Louisiana

The Jazz Club, New Orleans, Louisiana

AND The Plants Match the House Color!

AND The Plants Match the House Color!

The Jazz Club, New Orleans, Louisiana

The Jazz Club, New Orleans, Louisiana

Now for the Purple and Orange House! This one is an attention getter!

Purple and Orange House, New Orleans, Louisiana

Purple and Orange House, New Orleans, Louisiana

And One More thought! Size Matters!

Out of Scale: Out of Touch. No High Rise in Marigny! No tear downs and replacing them with high rise dwellings here! Good for them! New Orleans should look like New Orleans!

Size Matters!

Size Matters!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

 

 

Thursday Doors: April 21, 2016

My Favorite Door in Manarola, Cinque Terre, italy

My Favorite Door in Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

The View of All that Quirkiness, Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

The View of All that Quirkiness, Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

Today for Thursday Doors we are in Manarola, one of the five villages in Cinque Terre, Italy. We stayed at the tippy top of this small village and would walk down everyday to the harbor or train station. These are some of the doors I observed along the way! My favorite is the first Pale Blue Shutter Door! Quite quirky, don’t you think? That entire building was quirky from the porthole windows to the cement gate pass through! What about that wrought iron railing made up of different finds? I liked the curly ques placed at the top of the cement arbor too. The walkway was narrow so I could get up close and personal to study all the finds near this door!

More Sea Blue to Add a Touch of Contrast

More Sea Blue to Add a Touch of Contrast

Here a Touch of Green Goes a Long Way

Here a Touch of Green Goes a Long Way

Why Not Add a Bit of Red to Draw Your Eye?

Why Not Add a Bit of Red to Draw Your Eye?

Manarola may be the oldest of the villages in the Cinque Terre, with the cornerstone of the church, San Lorenzo, dating to 1338. The name Manarola is a form of the latin worlds “magna rota” which means “large wheel” in reference to the mill wheel in the village.

The Teeny Tiny Church Door of San Lorenzo

The Teeny Tiny Church Door of San Lorenzo Church

Notice the bell above the church? As part of the history of the church, we learned that at one time the priest liked to ring the bell a lot, to remind the villagers to come to Mass. The villagers pleaded with him to stop all the ringing, day and night, to no avail. The priest was found murdered in the church and the bell no longer tolls! No one was ever prosecuted for the murder either!

A Door With A Lot Going On Above It

A Door With A Lot Going On Above It

In the picture above one could jump out the window, scoot across the walkway and be gone on the next roof!

A Stroll Along Narrow Walkways Through the Village

A Stroll Along Narrow Walkways Through the Village

Most of the residents in Manarola are involved with the fishing or wine-making industry. The local wine, Sciacchetrà, is well known, and the high quality wine of the region was noted in Roman writings!  The only way to get around the five villages is by train, boat or the hiking trails in the hills and vineyards above the towns, which makes up the Cinque Terre National Park. To read another post about Manarola look Here. You can collect charms that represent each village in the Cinque Terre, to make a bracelet or necklace. To find out how to get the Cinque Terre Charms look Here!

What’s your favorite Door ?

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

Thursday Doors: April 14, 2016

Prison Door iInside Doge's Palace

Prison Door Inside Doge’s Palace, Venice, Italy

Today, let’s take a peek at some of the doors in Venice, Italy. I’ve been dreaming of sunny vacations for the past couple of weeks! Venice, Italy is one of those sunny, magical, dream come true spots on earth. But, it wasn’t so sunny for those who were sent to jail from the olden days until 1930.

This prison door has two big bolt locks and the peep window also has a lock! The door is narrow and one would have to be very short or stooped to get inside the cell. The cell is very small and windowless! The prison was attached to the Doge’s Palace, (the home of the ruling duke) by a passageway called the Bridge of Sighs, aptly named because you had to walk from the Doge’s Palace, where you were sentenced by a tribunal, over to the prison. It was your last look at the world, through a thick, marble, trellised window.

Inside Looking Out from Bridge of Sighs, Venice, Italy

Inside Looking Out from Bridge of Sighs, Venice, Italy

 

Looking Up at the Bridge of Sighs, Venice, Italy

Looking Up at the Bridge of Sighs, Venice, Italy

This is the Bridge of Sighs as it looks from the outside. There is a canal between the Doge’s Palace and the Prison.

To walk around Venice you follow very narrow pathways tucked between old buildings. You walk and suddenly the path comes to a dead end at a doorway! It’s easy to get lost or disoriented.

Narrow Pathways Between the Buildings in Venice, Italy

Narrow Pathways Between the Buildings in Venice, Italy

 

The Stop at the End is a Doorway in Venice, Italy

The Stop at the End is a Doorway in Venice, Italy

 

The Stop at the End is a Doorway in Venice, Italy

The Stop at the End is a Doorway in Venice, Italy

 

The Stop at the End is a Doorway in Venice, Italy

The Stop at the End is a Doorway in Venice, Italy

The buildings at the main intersections have  arrows directing you to the most popular spots, so you know which way to go to the most familiar sites. Here to cross the street you look up!

Look Up to See Where You Are in Venice, Italy

Look Up to See Where You Are in Venice, Italy

The best way to get around quickly is by gondola! The doors are at water level! Just step outside your place into a gondola! For a post about my gondola experience look HERE! All the photos were taken at close up and personal gondola level!

 

The Water Level Doors in Venice, Italy

The Water Level Doors in Venice, Italy

At the end of the day treat yourself to a sit and a drink! Nothing better than being served by a gent in a white tux! I hope you enjoyed our excursion around Venice! To see all my posts on Venice just click in the tag area on Venice!

The Florian, Venice, Italy

The Florian, Venice, Italy

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

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